This Week’s Strangest Science News


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This Week’s Strangest Science News

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At Live Science, we delve into science news from around the world every day — and some of those stories can get a little weird. Here are some of the strangest science news articles from this week.

Methane in the atmosphere gives Uranus its blue hue, as seen in this image from the Keck telescope from 2004.

Methane in the atmosphere gives Uranus its blue hue, as seen in this image from the Keck telescope from 2004.

Credit: Lawrence Sromovsky, University of Wisconsin/W. M. Keck Observatory

In case you were wondering, Uranus smells like farts. A new study found that the seventh planet from the sun has an upper atmosphere filled with hydrogen sulfide. This makes Uranus different from the gas giants Jupiter and Saturn, which have more ammonia in their upper atmospheres. [Read more about Uranus’ smell]

 Scientists at Brown University built an indoor asteroid cannon to see what might happen if one of these space rocks were to collide with Earth. During several trials, the researchers blasted the fake asteroid into a fake Earth at speeds “comparable to the median impact speed” in the asteroid belt, they wrote in a study. [Read more about the fake asteroid cannon]
An artist's interpretation of how the sloth likely flailed its arms around to protect itself against the human hunters.

An artist’s interpretation of how the sloth likely flailed its arms around to protect itself against the human hunters.

Credit: Alex McClelland/Bournemouth University

About 11,000 years ago, ancient humans followed a giant ground sloth, stepping in the tracks of its clawed paws. These track marks are now fossilized and indicate that the humans once interacted with — and possibly hunted — these now-extinct towering sloths in what is now New Mexico. [Read more about the fossilized footprints]

Could anyone transform a foil ball into a shiny metal sphere? Sure — if you have the right tools, and a lot of patience.

Could anyone transform a foil ball into a shiny metal sphere? Sure — if you have the right tools, and a lot of patience.

Credit: Seamster/Instructables.com/CC by 2.5

In a new internet trend, videos show crumpled aluminum foil balls transforming into beautifully smooth and highly polished spheres. But how do the people convert these ugly balls into stunning globes? Live Science looked into it and found that the technique has similarities with Japanese samurai sword making. [Read more about the aluminum foil spheres]

This parasitic ant, called <i>Megalomyrmex symmetochus</i>, crashes colonies of fungus-farming ants (<i>Sericomyrmex amabilis</i>), eating their crops and killing their babies.

This parasitic ant, called Megalomyrmex symmetochus, crashes colonies of fungus-farming ants (Sericomyrmex amabilis), eating their crops and killing their babies.

Credit: David Nash, courtesy of The Ohio State University

A sneaky, parasitic ant uses chemical warfare to get a free meal and home. This Central American ant has a potent venom that can scare off invaders. And even though this ant eats baby ants, it’s still accepted into the homes of certain ants that use it as a guard dog. [Read more about the sneaky ants]

A human bone dagger (top) from New Guinea and a cassowary bone dagger (bottom), attributed to the Abelam people of New Guinea

A human bone dagger (top) from New Guinea and a cassowary bone dagger (bottom), attributed to the Abelam people of New Guinea

Credit: Copyright Hood Museum of Art/Dartmouth College; Dominy NJ. et al, Royal Society Open Science

The warriors of New Guinea used to carve daggers out of two unusual thighbones — those from humans and others from flightless, dinosaur-like birds called cassowaries. But which dagger was better? A new analysis shows that the human-bone daggers were stronger, largely because of the way they were carved. [Read more about the bone daggers]

A brain scan shows a key lodged about 1.5 inches into a man's brain.

A brain scan shows a key lodged about 1.5 inches into a man’s brain.

Credit: Goal Post Media/SWNS

A 19-year-old man in India got into a brawl and ended up with a key embedded 1.5 inches (3.8 centimeters) into his skull. So, how did he survive? Luckily, the key didn’t cause internal bleeding or any damage to his brain, doctors said. [Read more about the key injury]

Want more weird science news and discoveries? Check out these and other “Strange News” stories on Live Science!

Original article on Live Science.

This Week’s Strangest Science News


Post 8678

This Week’s Strangest Science News

Partner Series

At Live Science, we delve into science news from around the world every day — and some of those stories can get a little weird. Here are some of the strangest science news articles from this week.

A new species of tardigrade (not shown here) was discovered in a parking lot in Japan.

A new species of tardigrade (not shown here) was discovered in a parking lot in Japan.

Credit: Shutterstock

Who doesn’t love tardigrades? These microscopic animals, also known as water bears, can survive just about anywhere on Earth, and a new species was recently discovered in a parking lot in Japan. [Read more about the even-weirder-than-usual tardigrades]

Majestic Denali stands roughly 20,000 feet (6,000 meters) tall and may hold up to 97 metric tons of human poop.

Majestic Denali stands roughly 20,000 feet (6,000 meters) tall and may hold up to 97 metric tons of human poop.

Credit: Shutterstock

Climbers in Alaska’s Denali National Park are facing stricter rules about disposing of their poop. New guidelines were recently introduced by the National Park Service to address the growing problem of human waste on Denali, estimated to be as much as 215,000 pounds. Climbers must now dispose of their poo at two designated areas — a ranger station or in a 14,000-foot-deep crevasse. [Read more about poop disposal on Denali]

A Nessus sphinx hawkmoth caterpillar (<i>Amphion floridensis</i>), munches on a wild grape leaf.

A Nessus sphinx hawkmoth caterpillar (Amphion floridensis), munches on a wild grape leaf.

Credit: Jayne Yack

Scientists investigated how certain types of caterpillars could make a range of unusual sounds — including whistles, pops, clicks, and buzzing. The researchers analyzed caterpillar-produced sound waves, and found that the insects made noise by forcing air through a small internal structure, like a teakettle producing a whistle. [Read more about the caterpillar communication]

An unusual white ring in the front of a woman's eyeball was the result of a rare condition. Above, an image of the patient's eye showing the ring around the edge of the cornea.

An unusual white ring in the front of a woman’s eyeball was the result of a rare condition. Above, an image of the patient’s eye showing the ring around the edge of the cornea.

Credit: The New England Journal of Medicine ©2018.

An unusual autoimmune condition produced a strange effect in a woman’s eye, generating a white circle in her cornea. [Read more about the eerie eye ring]

A male, yellow Northern cardinal perching on a branch in Mexico, Baja California.

A male, yellow Northern cardinal perching on a branch in Mexico, Baja California.

Credit: Hal Beral/Getty

The appearance of an extremely rare yellow cardinal in Alabama attracted birdwatchers eager to catch a glimpse of the unusual golden bird. Its sunny feathers are likely the result of a genetic mutation that impedes its ability to generate the chemical reactions that produce red hues. [Read more about the yellow cardinal]

Want more weird science news and discoveries? Check out these and other “Strange News” stories on Live Science!

This Week’s Strangest Science News


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This Week’s Strangest Science News

Partner Series
01:1301:13
 At Live Science, we delve into science news from around the world every day — and some of those stories can get a little weird. Here are some of the strangest science news articles from this week.

Credit: Miaopai.com

A man in China buying a replacement battery for his iPhone had an explosive experience when he tested the battery by biting it. [Read more about the exploding battery]

Camels are seen during a beauty contest as part of the annual King Abdulaziz Camel Festival in Rumah, some 160 kilometers east of Riyadh.

Camels are seen during a beauty contest as part of the annual King Abdulaziz Camel Festival in Rumah, some 160 kilometers east of Riyadh.

Credit: FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty

Camels are seen during a beauty contest as part of the annual King Abdulaziz Camel Festival in Rumah, some 160 kilometers east of Riyadh.
Credit: FAYEZ NURELDINE/AFP/Getty

The puckered pouts of 12 camel contestants in a Saudi Arabian camel beauty contest led to the camels’ disqualification, when officials discovered that a veterinarian had injected the animals’ faces with Botox. [Read more about the chemically enhanced camels]

Rats, which live alongside people all over the world, recently gave a Parisian trash collector an unpleasant surprise.

Rats, which live alongside people all over the world, recently gave a Parisian trash collector an unpleasant surprise.

Credit: Shutterstock

Rats, which live alongside people all over the world, recently gave a Parisian trash collector an unpleasant surprise.
Credit: Shutterstock

A garbage collector got an unpleasant surprise when he opened a plastic trash bin near the banks of the Seine, and found dozens of rats swarming inside. [Read more about the rat swarm]

Many flat-Earthers believe the Earth is a disc surrounded by an ice wall.

Many flat-Earthers believe the Earth is a disc surrounded by an ice wall.

Credit: FastMotion/Shutterstock

Many flat-Earthers believe the Earth is a disc surrounded by an ice wall.
Credit: FastMotion/Shutterstock

“Mad” Mike Hughes, a flat-Earth conspiracy theorist, is revisiting a previous aborted attempt to prove the Earth is flat, by launching a homemade rocket to take photos from about 1,800 feet (550 meters) above the ground, thereby “revealing” that the planet is a flattened disc (spoiler: it’s not). [Read more about the DIY rocket launch]

Divers recently found a group of red handfish (<i>Thymichthys politus</i>), a rare and critically endangered species known only in southeastern Tasmania, Australia.

Divers recently found a group of red handfish (Thymichthys politus), a rare and critically endangered species known only in southeastern Tasmania, Australia.

Credit: Auscape/UIG/Getty

Divers recently found a group of red handfish (Thymichthys politus), a rare and critically endangered species known only in southeastern Tasmania, Australia.
Credit: Auscape/UIG/Getty

Scientists recently discovered a previously unknown population of peculiar-looking fish in waters near Tasmania, Australia. Known as “red handfish,” they have distinctive red markings, dour expressions, and can “walk” using their fins. [Read more about the red handfish]

Want more weird science news and discoveries? Check out these and other “Strange News” stories on Live Science!

This Week’s Strangest Science News


Post 8599

This Week’s Strangest Science News

Partner Series

At Live Science, we delve into science news from around the world every day — and some of those stories can get a little weird. Here are some of the strangest science news articles from this week.

A mosquito foot magnified 800 times under a scanning electron microscope.

A mosquito foot magnified 800 times under a scanning electron microscope.

Credit: Steve Gschmeissner/RPS

This bizarre image of a mosquito foot sent Reddit into a frenzy as users gave it tens of thousands of upvotes. A bit a digging revealed that this photo — made with a scanning electron microscope by photographer Steve Gschmeissner — shows the end of a mosquito’s leg, including a claw, scales and the pulvillus, a pad with adhesive hairs. [Read more about the magnified mosquito foot]

Sheep can recognize celebrities? Ewe gotta be kidding.

Sheep can recognize celebrities? Ewe gotta be kidding.

Credit: Live Science; Shutterstock

Sheep can identify a person merely by looking at a photo, new research finds. Scientists showed sheep photos of famous people, including actress Emma Watson and former U.S. President Barack Obama. When given the choice between a stranger’s photo and a photo of the celebrity, the sheep chose the celebrity almost 80 percent of the time, even when the photo was taken from a different angle. [Read more about the smart sheep]

On Oct. 22, 2017, 245 people broke a record by "rope jumping" off a bridge in Hortolandia, Brazil.

On Oct. 22, 2017, 245 people broke a record by “rope jumping” off a bridge in Hortolandia, Brazil.

Credit: Paulo Whitaker/Reuters/Newscom

A group of 245 daredevils jumped off a bridge in Brazil and lived to tell the tale, thanks to a keen understanding of physics. The record-setting jump was made possible with a system of ropes, experts told Live Science. After the jump, the daredevils swung like pendulums from the bridge. [Read more about the incredible jump]

This artist's illustration depicts a hypothetical dust ring orbiting KIC 8462852, also known as Boyajian's Star or Tabby's Star.

This artist’s illustration depicts a hypothetical dust ring orbiting KIC 8462852, also known as Boyajian’s Star or Tabby’s Star.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

If an alien megastructure were the cause of the odd blinking seen from “Boyajian’s Star” (also known as “Tabby’s Star”), it would have to be massive enough to block the star’s light in a noticeable way. In other words, it would have to be on the order of five times the sun’s radius, and larger than the star, known as KIC 8462852, itself. [Read more about the size of the possible alien megastructure]

We’ve all heard of crash test dummies. But what about Robutt: the robot butt that tests car seats? Ford engineers estimate that people sit down on their car seats about 25,000 in a 10-year period. Robutt is now testing the Ford Fiesta to ensure these seats stay durable despite heavy use. [Read more about Robutt, the robot butt]

A female bonobo embraces a newcomer on her first day in a new group.

Credit: Courtesy of Lola ya Bonobo Sanctuary

Bonobo monkeys didn’t earn the nickname “hippie chimps” for nothing. New observations show that they help unfamiliar bonobos get a food reward, even when they didn’t receive a reward themselves. The monkeys also help strangers, regardless of whether the unknown bonobo asked for help in the first place. [Read more about these helpful monkeys]

The Greek sealstone's small size, along with the veining on the stone, meant that many of the tiny details could be seen only using photomicroscopy.

The Greek sealstone’s small size, along with the veining on the stone, meant that many of the tiny details could be seen only using photomicroscopy.

Credit: Courtesy of The Department of Classics, University of Cincinnati

Researchers found a real treasure: an intricately carved gemstone in an ancient Greek tomb. The gemstone carving depicts a warrior standing over the body of a slain enemy, plunging his sword into another soldier’s neck. [Read more about the gemstone discovery]

Want more weird science news and discoveries? Check out these and other “Strange News” stories on Live Science!

This Week’s Strangest Science News


Post 8551

This Week’s Strangest Science News

At Live Science, we delve into science news from around the world every day — and some of those stories can get a little weird. Here are some of the strangest science news articles from this week.

An X-ray of the man's abdomen. The large white mass is the metal bezoar.

An X-ray of the man’s abdomen. The large white mass is the metal bezoar.

Credit: The BMJ

A man in France who had psychosis swallowed more than 100 pieces of metal, and needed surgery on multiple occasions to remove these metal masses from his gut. [Read more about these “metal bezoars“]

 

Archaeologists in Boston are knee-deep in the remains of what may have been Paul Revere’s outhouse. They’re hoping to find some biological evidence of how Revere’s family ate, and other pieces of information from that time. [Read more about the Colonial outhouse]

Scientists in Ireland showed that an enzyme found in human tears, saliva and the egg whites can generate electricity. The enzyme, called lysozyme, generates a charge when pressure is applied to it. [Read more about the electric enzyme]

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https://www.facebook.com/risdawaty.nababan/posts/2004812479766035&width=500

A village in Indonesia enjoyed a snake-meat feast this weekend after a resident wrestled and killed a 26-foot-long (7.8 meters) python. [Read more about the massive python]

<em>Paranthropus boisei</em>, whose skull cast is shown here, roamed across East Africa 1.4 million to 2..4 million years ago.

Paranthropus boisei, whose skull cast is shown here, roamed across East Africa 1.4 million to 2..4 million years ago.

Credit: Louise Walsh

The ancestors of modern humans may have gotten genital herpes from the now-extinct relative of humanity commonly known as “Nutcracker Man.” [Read more about how humans got this STD]

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=1724727454501935&set=a.1569825423325473.1073741828.100008940905763&type=3&width=500

A Canadian model partially lost her vision after she got an eyeball tattoo, which involves injecting ink into the white part of the eye, called the sclera. [Read more about eyeball tattoos]

Want more weird science news and discoveries? Check out these and other “Strange News” stories on Live Science!

Original article on Live Science.

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This Week’s Strangest Science News


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This Week’s Strangest Science News

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At Live Science, we delve into science news from around the world every day — and some of those stories can get a little weird. Here are some of the strangest science news articles from this week.

Fire ants weren’t going to go softly into the night after Harvey flooded Houston. Rather, they banded together to make fire ant rafts, which are buoyant, in part, because the ants can trap air with their bodies. [Read more about the fire ant rafts, and learn how to sink them]

Fossilized eggs belonging to the Cretaceous dinosaur Heyuannia huangi hold traces of pigment hinting that they were a blue-green color. To the naked eye, they appear blackish-brown.

Fossilized eggs belonging to the Cretaceous dinosaur Heyuannia huangi hold traces of pigment hinting that they were a blue-green color. To the naked eye, they appear blackish-brown.

Credit: Copyright 2017 Wiemann et al.

About 66 million years ago, a bird-like dinosaur laid a clutch of blue-green eggs in what is now China. How do researchers know the color of these ancient eggs? They studied the pigments within them. [Read more about the dinosaurs’ colorful eggs]

Birling Gap beach and the Seven Sisters chalk cliffs, East Sussex, England.

Birling Gap beach and the Seven Sisters chalk cliffs, East Sussex, England.

Credit: Solnechnaja/Shutterstock

A strange chemical fog swept through beaches in southern England on Sunday (Aug. 27), prompting nearly 150 people to seek medical attention for stinging eyes, sore throats and vomiting. The fog disappeared on Monday, and its contents are still unknown. [Read more about the mysterious chemical fog]

Some people in California put sunscreen on their eyes, thinking it would offer protection while they gazed at last week’s solar eclipse (which was a partial eclipse in the Golden State). However, this was a bad idea: sunscreen doesn’t protect your eyes if you look at the sun, and it can sting and irritate your eyes, as well. [Read more about this sunscreen debacle]

Researchers found that Myrmoteras ants' jaws work differently than those of any other known ant.

Researchers found that Myrmoteras ants’ jaws work differently than those of any other known ant.

Credit: Steve Shattuck

This is a cool party trick: The jaws of Myrmoteras ants can snap shut in about half a millisecond. What’s more, these ants’ jaws are unique, and work differently than those of other known ant species. [Read more about these spectacular, superfast ants]

A prehistoric human skeleton in the Chan Hol Cave near Tulúm on Mexico's Yucatán peninsula.

A prehistoric human skeleton in the Chan Hol Cave near Tulúm on Mexico’s Yucatán peninsula.

Credit: Tom Poole/Liquid Junge Lab

Cryptic divers stole what may be among the oldest human skeletons in North America. The skeleton was found in an underwater cavern on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula five years ago. Although robbers stole most of it, scientists are studying a few bones the robbers missed. [Read more about the looted, prehistoric skeleton]

Artificial intelligence provides an offbeat perspective on what lies ahead for the characters of "Game of Thrones."

Artificial intelligence provides an offbeat perspective on what lies ahead for the characters of “Game of Thrones.”

Credit: HBO

A software engineer has programmed artificial intelligence (AI) to write a new “Game of Thrones” book using the characters and style from George R.R. Martin’s hit “A Song of Ice and Fire” series. But the AI’s effort might still have a ways to go before it becomes a best-seller, especially when you take this sentence it wrote into account: “Jaime killed Cersei and was cold and full of words, and Jon thought he was the wolf now.” [Read more about the “Game of Thrones” AI]

Want more weird science news and discoveries? Check out these and other “Strange News” stories on Live Science!

Original article on Live Science.