Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week


Post 8694

Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week

 Each week we find the most interesting and informative articles we can and along the way we uncover amazing and cool images. Here you’ll discover 10 incredible photos and the stories behind them.

Nature or no:

An unsettling image of a very strange fish skeleton seems more suited to a conversation about demonology than one about marine biology.

[Full Story: ‘Demonic’ Fish Glows in Eerie Photo]


Snack-time

New images show the brain’s “helper cells” nibbling on synapses, the connections between neurons.

[Full Story: New Images Spot Elusive ‘Snacking’ Brain Cells]


Downsized animals?

Whales are giant beasts, but why aren’t even larger, supersize whales swimming around?

[Full Story: Why Aren’t There Any Supersize Whales?]


Frightening predator:

A truck-size dinosaur that sported sharp, long claws the length of bowling pins once tore across the South American landscape, terrorizing animals it hoped to eat about 85 million years ago, a new study finds.

[Full Story: This Truck-Size Dinosaur Terrorized Prey with Razor-Sharp ‘Meat Hooks’]


Something to see

Scientists expect that as the station burns up, it will generate huge fireballs visible from the ground.

[Full Story: Crashing Chinese Space Station Will Go Down Shooting — Fireballs]


Rare condition:

A New Jersey man’s “beer belly” turned out to be a 30-lb. (13.6 kilograms) tumor.

[Full Story: A Man’s ‘Beer Belly’ Was Actually a Massive Tumor]


Preserving history:

Mysterious brown spots on the ancient artwork of Tutankhamun’s tomb are not growing larger as previously feared.

[Full Story: Mysterious Brown Spots on King Tut’s Tomb Are ‘Dead’]


Not-so-fun:

This will take the fun out of bathtime: Rubber ducky toys are teeming with bacteria and fungi, a new study finds.

[Full Story: Here’s What Growing Inside Your Rubber Ducky]


Inch by inch

Mount Etna’s entire bulk is moving.

[Full Story: Mount Etna Is Slip-Sliding Toward the Sea]

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Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week


Post 8639

Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week

 Each week we find the most interesting and informative articles we can and along the way we uncover amazing and cool images. Here you’ll discover 10 incredible photos and the stories behind them.

Deep-Sea Alien:

Imagine this fearsome sight: an ink-black shark with gnarly, needle-like teeth; creepy, glass-like eyes; a glowing belly and a potentially extendable jaw. That’s what scientists saw when they pulled up this rare creature, along with four of its pals.

[Full Story: ‘Alien’ Shark with Goblin-Like Jaws Hauled Up from the Deep Sea]


The Blackest Black:

Male birds of paradise have specialized feathers that reflect back only the barest amount of light, creating a light-sucking matte effect.

[Full Story: The ‘Black Hole’ Optical Illusion of the Bird of Paradise Explained]


Bizarre Hitmen:

These killer spiders look like birds and strike like ninjas. New research suggests there’s way more of them than scientists thought.

[Full Story: Pelican Spiders Are the Weirdest-Looking Assassins You’ll Ever See]


Disturbing Robot:

This dirt-dispersing robot-baby torso will crawl out of the lab and into your nightmares.

[Full Story: Why Scientists Just Created the Creepiest Robot Baby You’ll Ever See]


Strange Swirling Droplet:

A viral GIF shows a single drop of liquid spinning like a glorious galaxy until it suddenly evaporates. Why? Good question.

[Full Story: Even Chemists Are Baffled by This GIF of a Droplet Spiraling to Its Doom]


Layers of Ice:

The newfound sheets are buried by just a few feet of Martian dirt in some places, meaning it might be accessible to future crewed missions.

[Full Story: Huge Glaciers Found Hiding Beneath Mars Surface]


In Fossilized Color:

Fossilized eye tissue in a 120-million-year-old bird has revealed that this ancient creature could likely see in color.

[Full Story: This Bird ‘Eyeball’ Survived 120 Million Years]


Surviving the Cold:

Why did these alligators stick their noses out of the water during last week’s cold snap?

[Full Story: Alligators ‘Snorkel’ to Survive Ice-Covered Swamp]


Unexpected Savior:

A marine biologist was surprised when a humpback whale started lifting her out of the water — and even more surprised when she saw what it was protecting her from.

[Full Story: This Humpback Whale Saved a Woman’s Life, But Probably Not on Purpose]


Shark-cicles:

As the Arctic blast continues to roil the Eastern Seaboard with gusty winds and frigid temperatures, at least four thresher sharks have been found frozen off the coast of Cape Cod.

[Full Story: Frozen Sharks Washing Up on Cape Cod]

Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week


Post 8633

Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week

 Each week we find the most interesting and informative articles we can and along the way we uncover amazing and cool images. Here you’ll discover 10 incredible photos and the stories behind them.

Falling Iguanas:

It’s snowing iguanas in Florida. The good news is they probably aren’t dead.

[Full Story: Watch for Falling Iguanas! Bomb Cyclone Drops Frozen Lizards]


Tooooo Cold:

The “bomb cyclone,” with its whipping winds and foot-plus snowdrifts, has passed. So what gives?

[Full Story: Brrrr! Why It’s So $#%*! Cold]


Losing Oxygen:

Oxygen is draining from the oceans, and oxygen-depleted “dead zones” are on the rise.

[Full Story: The Ocean Is Suffocating, and It’s Our Fault]


Icy Waves:

There’s one upside to the frigid weather: gorgeous slushy waves.

[Full Story: Surf’s Frozen? Slurpee Waves Spotted on Nantucket Beach]


Earth Under Seige:

As a powerful bomb cyclone winter storm curls across the U.S. East Coast this morning (Jan. 4), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) GOES-East satellite is snapping stunning images of the Earth’s surface.

[Full Story: ‘Bomb Cyclone’ Swirls Across US East Coast in a Stunning View of Earth]


Snow in Florida:

It may not be much – just 0.1 inches (0.25 centimeters) – but it’s the first measurable snowfall Tallahassee, Florida, has seen in 28 years.

[Full Story: Flaky Weather: Why Tallahassee Got Its 1st Measurable Snow in Decades]


Beauty on a Butt:

Behold the tiny, luminous badonkadonk that could further the field of optics.

[Full Story: ‘Nature’s Smallest Rainbow’ Found on Australian Spider’s Butt]


Effects of a Bomb:

An intense “bomb cyclone” is battering the U.S. East Coast today (Jan. 4), with high winds and intense snowfall forecast for the mid-Atlantic and northeastern states. See the latest views from NASA and NOAA here.

[Full Story: See the ‘Bomb Cyclone’ Hit US East Coast in These NASA and NOAA Gifs]


Overcoming a Disease:

For the past four years, a mysterious syndrome has been killing millions of sea stars along the West Coast, turning the five-armed critters into piles of goo. But now, the sea stars appear to be making a comeback, according to news reports.

[Full Story: Sea Stars Make a Comeback After Mysterious ‘Goo’ Disease Killed Millions]


Mapping the World:

Google Earth is an amazing trove of visuals from all over the planet, and new strange things turn up in it all the time. Here are the best from 2017.

[Full Story: 6 Strange Sites Spotted on Google Earth in 2017]

Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week


Post 8579

Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week

 Each week we find the most interesting and informative articles we can and along the way we uncover amazing and cool images. Here you’ll discover 10 incredible photos and the stories behind them.

Checkin’ things out:

A great white shark left scientists “buzzing” after it grabbed a baited underwater research camera and dragged it to the surface — not once, but three times, according to researchers at Massey University in New Zealand.

[Full Story: Crunch! Curious Great White Shark Snags Underwater Camera]


Strange behavior:

Nest-building wasps in Malaysia were recently captured “blowing bubbles,” expelling tiny droplets of water that they absorbed from their damp nests.

[Full Story: Incredible Image of Bubble-Blowing Wasp Has a Scientific Explanation]


Saving a life:

A rescued bear with an enormous tongue gets surgery in Myanmar.

[Full Story: Unbearable: An Enormously Swollen Tongue Was Destroying a Bear’s Life]


Ancient rarity:

An old sketch reveals a rare solar phenomenon.

[Full Story: Teen Astronomer’s 1886 Sketch Reveals Rare White Solar Flare]


Frightening moth:

Male <i>Creatonotos gangis</i> moths have hairy scent organs that release pheromones during courtship.
Male Creatonotos gangis moths have hairy scent organs that release pheromones during courtship.

Credit: Alamy

A moth that looks like it crawled out of a shadowy underworld is freaking out Facebook users, including some who are wondering whether the creature in the post is even real.

[Full Story: What on Earth? Freaky Moth with Hairy ‘Butt Appendages’ Stuns Facebook]


Odd source:

More than 1,000 years ago, a woman living in the British Isles became horribly disfigured after catching leprosy from an unlikely source: a squirrel, according to a new study.

[Full Story: How a Squirrel May Have Infected a Medieval Woman with Leprosy]


A winter home:

Scientists spotted this huge jellyfish (<em>Chrysaora melanaster</em>) dragging a crustacean with one of its tentacles under the sea ice covering the Chukchi Sea off the north coast of Alaska.
Scientists spotted this huge jellyfish (Chrysaora melanaster) dragging a crustacean with one of its tentacles under the sea ice covering the Chukchi Sea off the north coast of Alaska.

Credit: Andrew Juhl and Craig Aumack

Surprisingly, adult jellyfish survive the winter under the Arctic’s thick sea ice.

[Full Story: Rare Footage Captures Giant Jellyfish Living Under Arctic Ice]


Weather changes:

In winter, something happens to the skulls of adult red-toothed shrews that is exceedingly rare among vertebrates.

[Full Story: Shrews’ Heads (and Brains) Shrink As Seasons Change]


Rules? What Rules?

In cognition tests, clever raccoons demonstrated that they would not hesitate to bend the rules to get their rewards.

[Full Story: Raccoons Ace Cognition Test (But Sometimes They Cheat)]


Hiding in plain sight:

A “masked” dinosaur that lived 130 million years ago was a master at disguise who could hide even in broad daylight from its predators, relatives of the fearsome Tyrannosaurus rex, a new study finds.

[Full Story: Dinosaur with Raccoon-Like Mask Hid in Broad Daylight]

Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week


Post 8570

Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week

 Each week we find the most interesting and informative articles we can and along the way we uncover amazing and cool images. Here you’ll discover 10 incredible photos and the stories behind them.

An extraordinary find:

 

Amazing images and GIFs making the rounds on Twitter reveal little-known marine creatures.

[Full Story: Sea Lilies on Twitter Are Mesmerizing … And Not What They Seem]


Deeply-rooted protection:

An extraordinarily well-preserved fossil of a young sea turtle that lived 54 million years ago contains molecules of dark pigments that would have protected the animal from the sun.

[Full Story: 54-Million-Year-Old Baby Sea Turtle Had Built-In Sunscreen]


Not without a fight:

In a stunning frog photo recently shared widely from Reddit, a swallowed snake isn’t going down without a fight.

[Full Story: Snake Head Pops Out of Frog’s Maw in Mesmerizing Photo]


Travel to the past:

The VR experience will bring you face to face with one of the most famous wreck-diving sites in the world: the WWII SS Thistlegorm, which was sunk by German bombers in 1941 in the Red Sea.

[Full Story: VR Experience Takes You into Famed WWII Shipwreck]


End of an era:

Thousands of years ago, fallout from volcanic activity may have sounded a death knell for an Egyptian dynasty.

[Full Story: Volcanic Eruptions May Have Doomed an Ancient Egyptian Dynasty]


Far from home:

More than 4,000 years ago, ancient Egyptian artisans carved the likeness of a queen into a wooden statue and even bejeweled her highness with wooden earrings, according to a new discovery announced today by Egypt’s antiquities ministry.

[Full Story: Statue of Egyptian Queen Unearthed Near Giza Pyramids]


Odd creature:

Resembling a dainty tulip bloom or an elegant white-wine glass, the 500-million-year-old bottom-feeder looked uniquely ready for a romantic evening of sucking up microplankton along the seafloor.

[Full Story: Ancient Sea Creature Looked Like a Wine Glass, Died Alone]


Rocky finds:

The sprawling stone structures date back thousands of years and drape across old lava fields.

[Full Story: 400 Mysterious Ancient Stone Structures Discovered in Saudi Arabia]


A horrifying first:

Moments after a wild chimpanzee was born, an adult chimp snatched the infant away from its mother and cannibalized it, according to a new study that is the first to document this macabre behavior.

[Full Story: Infant Chimp Snatched and Cannibalized Moments After Its Birth]


Wondrous geology:

Photos of craggy rock and a time-lapse photo of stars are just two of the winning entries for the “100 Great Geosites” photography competition, held by The Geological Society of London.

[Full Story: In Photos: The UK’s Geologic Wonders]

Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week


Post 8548

Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week

Each week we find the most interesting and informative articles we can and along the way we uncover amazing and cool images. Here you’ll discover 10 incredible photos and the stories behind them.

Big Beautiful Break:

An iceberg could shed light on warming-fueled fate of Antarctica.

[Full Story: Massive Calved Iceberg Comes into View as Antarctic Sun Rises]


History at our Fingertips:

In the great desolation and emptiness of northwestern New Mexico, the ruins of an advanced Pre-Columbian civilization is preserved today within a 53-square-mile national historic park.

[Full Story: Chaco Canyon Photos: Amazing Ruins from an Ancient World]


A Celebration:

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https://www.facebook.com/risdawaty.nababan/posts/2004812479766035&width=500

A village in Indonesia enjoyed a snake-meat feast this weekend after a resident wrestled and killed a 26 foot-long (7.8 meters) python.

[Full Story: Man v. Snake: 26-Foot-Long Python Loses Epic Battle]


Mini-Gymnast:

Doctors in Mexico snapped a stunning photo of an acrobatic arthropod flipping and twirling. But the critter was far from a medical marvel — rather, the crab-shaped parasite was a lowly pubic louse.

[Full Story: Tiny Acrobat: Louse Photographed Flipping and Twirling ]


After Maria:

Puerto Rico’s Cayo Santiago Research Station has been a world-famous site for primate studies since 1938. Now scientists are working to save its staff and rhesus monkey colony after Hurricane Maria.

[Full Story: Scientists Race to Save Puerto Rico’s ‘Monkey Island’]


Battle to the Death:

With a skull-piercing bite, a jaguar makes a caiman into a meal.

[Full Story: Jaguar v. Caiman Death Battle Photographed in Brazil]


Pieces and Parts:

Surgeons removed more than 100 pieces of metal of various shapes and sizes from the stomach of a man in France, according to a new report of the man’s case.

[Full Story: Doctors Remove More Than 100 Pieces of Metal from a Man’s Stomach]


Elegant Parts:

A graceful bronze arm once attached to a statue dating to the first century was recently recovered from an ancient shipwreck near the Greek island of Antikythera.

[Full Story: Bronze Arm Found at Antikythera Shipwreck]


Say Cheese!

Photographers with the European Space Agency hoping to spot the International Space Station crossing the face of the sun got more than they bargained for when a bird joined the party.

[Full Story: Bird Photobombs the Space Station and Sun in Awesome Photo]

Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week


Post 8376

Amazing Images: The Best Science Photos of the Week