The Best Science Photos of 2019


Post 8770

The Best Science Photos of 2019

By Jeanna Bryner – Live Science Editor-in-Chief 9 days ago

https://www.livescience.com/best-science-photos-of-2019.html

running man nebula
(Image: © Steven Mohr)
Science can be beautiful, and gross, and surprising, and awe-inspiring. From stoic primates and graceful sea creatures, to cosmic cannibals and black hole jets, to bloody waterfalls and sparkling glaciers, this year was full of visual treasures in the science realm. Here are some of our favorite science photos of 2019.
World river maps

Rivers get the rainbow treatment in a gorgeous series of maps from Hungarian cartographer Robert Szucs, who has a background in geographic information systems (GIS). He created the gorgeous maps because he was bored by standard river maps with "all the lines blue, all the same width," he said.

(Image credit: Robert Szucs, Cartographer)

Rivers get the rainbow treatment in a gorgeous series of maps from Hungarian cartographer Robert Szucs, who has a background in geographic information systems (GIS). He created the gorgeous maps because he was bored by standard river maps with “all the lines blue, all the same width,” he said.

Super blood moon eclipse

super blood wolf moon lunar eclipse 2019

(Image credit: MARCEL KUSCH/AFP/Getty Images))
The super blood wolf moon lunar eclipse graced the skies late-night on Jan. 20, 2019, as our lone satellite began its trek into Earth’s outer shadow or penumbra. The pinnacle of the show, the total eclipse, happened between 11:41 p.m. and 12:43 p.m. EST (8:41 p.m. and 9:43 p.m. PST), when Earth’s umbra had entirely engulfed the moon. Here, Marcel Kusch captures this image in Duisburg, Germany, showing the super blood moon eclipse above an industrial plant.

Humpback whale mama

humpback whale and calf

(Image credit: François Baelen, Ocean Art 2018)
Photographer François Baelen was diving near Reunion Island in the Western Indian Ocean when he captured this otherworldly image of a mother humpback whale and her calf (top right). The photo took the top prize in the Ocean Art 2018 wide-angle category, whose winners were announced in January 2019.

Ray courtship

spinetail devil ray trio

(Image credit: Duncan Murrell, Ocean Art 2018))

This spectacular image of a trio of spinetail devil rays (Mobula japonica) won the Best in Show in the 2018 Ocean Art underwater photography competition held by Underwater Photography Guide. The winners were announced in January 2019.

Black hole jets

plasma jets black hole

(Image credit: Kyle Parfrey et al./Berkeley Lab)

Kyle Parfrey of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, and his colleagues created a computer model showing how charged particles near the edge of a black hole generate twisting and rotating magnetic fields. Here, a simulation of so-called collisionless relativistic plasma shows the density of positrons, or antimatter partners to electrons, near a rotating black hole.

Milky Way star map

milky way star map

(Image credit: R. White (STScI) and the PS1 Science Consortium)

At the end of January, scientists at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa (UH) created a map that they hailed the biggest release of astronomical data of all time. By compiling data from four years of observations by the Pan-STARRS observatory in Maui, the researchers created a mosaic of the Milky Way (red smear in the middle) and its cosmic neighborhood. The map showed more than 800 million stars, galaxies and roving interstellar objects.

Deepest universe view

hubble ultra-deep field image

(Image credit: A. S. Borlaff et al.)
The Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) combines hundreds of images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope over multiple years to create the deepest view of the universe ever created. The composite photo, released in January, contains a whopping 10,000 galaxies.

Twisted milky way

milky way galaxy s-shape

(Image credit: CHEN Xiaodian)
Our home galaxy changed shape this year, or at least how we view it. Scientists found that at the edges of the Milky Way, where the pull of gravity weakens, the shape of the galaxy warps. Instead of lying in a flat plane, the galaxy takes on a bit of a twisted “S” shape.

Wildlife photography awards

Image credit: Tracey Lund, United Kingdom, Shortlist, Open competition, Natural World & Wildlife, 2019 Sony World Photography Awards)
Tracey Lund, of the United Kingdom, captured this action shot of gannets snagging fish underwater, and in doing so, Lund also snagged a finalist spot in the Natural World & Wildlife category of the 2019 Sony World Photography Awards.

 

 

 

 

 

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