The Most Interesting Science News Articles of the Week


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The Most Interesting Science News Articles of the Week

Each week we uncover the most interesting and informative articles from around the world, here are 10 of the coolest stories in science this week.

Scientists have their eyes on a new breakthrough in laser technology. It involves cow eyeballs.

Scientists have their eyes on a new breakthrough in laser technology. It involves cow eyeballs.

Credit: Shutterstock

Ordinary contact lenses just moved one step closer to letting you shoot lasers from your eyes.

But don’t worry — nobody’s building battalions of bovines that can blast beams from their eyes. [Read more about the eyeballs.]

This DigitalGlobe satellite image shows Punggye-ri, the North Korea nuclear test site.

This DigitalGlobe satellite image shows Punggye-ri, the North Korea nuclear test site.

Credit: DigitalGlobe/38 North via Getty Images

North Korea conducted its latest nuclear test at Punggye-ri on Sept. 3, and it was the most massive one yet, registering on sensors as a 6.3-magnitude earthquake. Around 8 minutes later, geologists detected a smaller rumbling of 4.1 magnitude that got scientists speculating: Could the nuclear test site, hidden inside a mountain, have collapsed? [Read more about the trial.]

An illustration of human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV).

An illustration of human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV).

Credit: Science Photo Library/Alamy

It’s related to HIV, yet you’ve probably never heard of it: a virus called human T-cell leukemia virus type 1, or HTLV-1.

But what exactly is HTLV-1, and how is it different from HIV? [Read more about the virus.]

Gamers around the world helped physicists crowdsource a reality check.

Gamers around the world helped physicists crowdsource a reality check.

Credit: Shutterstock

A groundbreaking quantum experiment recently confirmed the reality of “spooky action-at-a-distance” — the bizarre phenomenon that Einstein hated — in which linked particles seemingly communicate faster than the speed of light. [Read more about the test.]

Humanoid robot Atlas is on the move.

Credit: Boston Dynamics

You can run from Boston Dynamics’ humanoid robot Atlas, but it wouldn’t do you any good — the robot can run after you.

This isn’t the first time that Atlas’ antics have gone viral. Atlas appeared in a video compilation posted to YouTube on Feb. 23, 2016, that showed the robot walking flat-footed through a snow-covered forest, stacking boxes on shelves and recovering its balance after a Boston Dynamics employee pushed the bot with a hockey stick. [Read more about the robot.]

Elon Musk and musician Grimes show up as a couple to the 2018 Met Gala on May 7 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
Elon Musk and musician Grimes show up as a couple to the 2018 Met Gala on May 7 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Credit: ANGELA WEISS/AFP/Getty Images

It’s Elon Musk at his Elon Musk-iest: According to news reports, the space-and-electric-car entrepreneur met his current girlfriend by making a joke about treacherous artificial intelligence. [Read more about the experiment.]

Chlamydia in koalas is no laughing matter.

Chlamydia in koalas is no laughing matter.

Credit: Shutterstock

One of the leading killers of Australia’s endearing koalas is a debilitating bacterial infection: chlamydia. [Read more about the situation.]

Your 'behavioral immune system' is a thing, and it might be making every potential love interest seem too disgusting to date.
Your ‘behavioral immune system’ is a thing, and it might be making every potential love interest seem too disgusting to date.

Credit: Shutterstock

That is the question of dating. And while you might believe the answer hinges mostly on “chemistry” or mutual interests, a team of psychology researchers from McGill University in Montreal suggests that there’s an unlikely judge ultimately making the call: your behavioral immune system.

In the study, Sawada and her colleagues recruited several hundred people ages 18 to 35, who were single and heterosexual, to participate in either an in-person or online speed-dating experiment. [Read more about the culprit.]

The ice age horse is about the size of a large Shetland pony.

The ice age horse is about the size of a large Shetland pony.

Credit: Thanksgiving Point

During the last ice age, a small horse about the size of a Shetland pony somehow trampled into a big lake. It’s unclear how the animal died, but its body fell to the bottom of the lake, where it lay buried for about 16,000 years — that is, until this past fall, when landscapers in Utah unexpectedly unearthed the horse’s remains in their backyard.

Though the horse’s death will remain a mystery, researchers are excited to study its remains. [Read more about remains.]

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