Image Archive: Nebulae – Part 1


Post 8718

Image Archive: Nebulae

https://www.spacetelescope.org/images/archive/category/nebulae/

Westerlund 2 — Hubble’s 25th anniversary image

About the Object

Name: Gum 29, RCW 49,Westerlund 2,WR 20a
Type: Milky Way : Star : Grouping : Cluster : Open
Milky Way : Nebula
Distance: 20000 light years
Constellation: Carina
Category: Anniversary
Nebulae
Star Clusters

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image of the cluster Westerlund 2 and its surroundings has been released to celebrate Hubble’s 25th year in orbit and a quarter of a century of new discoveries, stunning images and outstanding science.

The image’s central region, containing the star cluster, blends visible-light data taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys and near-infrared exposures taken by the Wide Field Camera 3. The surrounding region is composed of visible-light observations taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), A. Nota (ESA/STScI), and the Westerlund 2 Science Team

The original observations of Westerlund 2 were obtained by the science team: Antonella Nota (ESA/STScI), Elena Sabbi (STScI), Eva Grebel and Peter Zeidler (Astronomisches Rechen-Institut Heidelberg), Monica Tosi (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna), Alceste Bonanos (National Observatory of Athens, Astronomical Institute), Carol Christian (STScI/AURA) and Selma de Mink (University of Amsterdam). Follow-up observations were made by the Hubble Heritage team: Zoltan Levay (STScI), Max Mutchler, Jennifer Mack, Lisa Frattare, Shelly Meyett, Mario Livio, Carol Christian (STScI/AURA), and Keith Noll (NASA/GSFC).

New view of the Pillars of Creation — visible

About the Object

Name: Eagle Nebula, M 16, Messier 16
Type: Milky Way : Nebula : Type : Star Formation
Distance: 7000 light years
Constellation: Serpens Cauda
Category: Nebulae

The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has revisited one of its most iconic and popular images: the Eagle Nebula’s Pillars of Creation. This image shows the pillars as seen in visible light, capturing the multi-coloured glow of gas clouds, wispy tendrils of dark cosmic dust, and the rust-coloured elephants’ trunks of the nebula’s famous pillars.

The dust and gas in the pillars is seared by the intense radiation from young stars and eroded by strong winds from massive nearby stars. With these new images comes better contrast and a clearer view for astronomers to study how the structure of the pillars is changing over time.

Credit:

NASA, ESA/Hubble and the Hubble Heritage Team

Extreme star cluster bursts into life in new Hubble image

About the Object

Name: NGC 3603
Type: Milky Way : Star : Grouping : Cluster : Open
Distance: 20000 light years
Constellation: Carina
Category: Nebulae
Star Clusters

The star-forming region NGC 3603 – seen here in the latest Hubble Space Telescope image – contains one of the most impressive massive young star clusters in the Milky Way. Bathed in gas and dust the cluster formed in a huge rush of star formation thought to have occurred around a million years ago. The hot blue stars at the core are responsible for carving out a huge cavity in the gas seen to the right of the star cluster in NGC 3603’s centre.

Credit:

NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration

The Bubble Nebula

About the Object

Name: Bubble Nebula,NGC 7635
Type: Milky Way : Nebula : Appearance : Emission : H II Region
Distance: 8000 light years
Constellation: Cassiopeia
Category: Nebulae

The Bubble Nebula, also known as NGC 7635, is an emission nebula located 8 000 light-years away. This stunning new image was observed by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to celebrate its 26th year in space.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage Team

New infrared view of the Horsehead Nebula — Hubble’s 23rd anniversary image

This new Hubble image, captured and released to celebrate the telescope’s 23rd year in orbit, shows part of the sky in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter). Rising like a giant seahorse from turbulent waves of dust and gas is the Horsehead Nebula, otherwise known as Barnard 33.

This image shows the region in infrared light, which has longer wavelengths than visible light and can pierce through the dusty material that usually obscures the nebula’s inner regions. The result is a rather ethereal and fragile-looking structure, made of delicate folds of gas — very different to the nebula’s appearance in visible light.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI)

Coordinates

Position (RA): 5 41 0.99
Position (Dec): -2° 27′ 11.92″
Field of view: 5.78 x 6.04 arcminutes
Orientation: North is 103.0° left of vertical

 

About the Object

Name: Eagle Nebula,Messier 16
Type: Milky Way : Nebula : Type : Star Formation
Distance: 7000 light years
Constellation: Serpens Cauda
Category: Nebulae

Coordinates

Position (RA): 18 19 16.19
Position (Dec): -13° 45′ 23.56″
Field of view: 3.21 x 6.50 arcminutes
Orientation: North is 96.8° left of vertical

Light continues to echo three years after stellar outburst

The Hubble Space Telescope’s latest image of the star V838 Monocerotis (V838 Mon) reveals dramatic changes in the illumination of surrounding dusty cloud structures. The effect, called a light echo, has been unveiling never-before-seen dust patterns ever since the star suddenly brightened for several weeks in early 2002.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI)

About the Object

Name: V838 Mon
Type: Milky Way : Nebula
Category: Nebulae

Hubble’s newest camera images ghostly star-forming pillar of gas and dust

Resembling a nightmarish beast rearing its head from a crimson sea, this celestial object is actually just a pillar of gas and dust. Called the Cone Nebula (in NGC 2264) – so named because in ground-based images it has a conical shape – this monstrous pillar resides in a turbulent star-forming region. This picture, taken by the newly installed Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the upper 2.5 light-years of the Cone, a height that equals 23 million roundtrips to the Moon. The entire pillar is seven light-years long.

Radiation from hot, young stars (located beyond the top of the image) has slowly eroded the nebula over millions of years. Ultraviolet light heats the edges of the dark cloud, releasing gas into the relatively empty region of surrounding space. There, additional ultraviolet radiation causes the hydrogen gas to glow, which produces the red halo of light seen around the pillar. A similar process occurs on a much smaller scale to gas surrounding a single star, forming the bow-shaped arc seen near the upper left side of the Cone. This arc, seen previously with the Hubble telescope, is 65 times larger than the diameter of our Solar System. The blue-white light from surrounding stars is reflected by dust. Background stars can be seen peeking through the evaporating tendrils of gas, while the turbulent base is pockmarked with stars reddened by dust.

Over time, only the densest regions of the Cone will be left. But inside these regions, stars and planets may form. The Cone Nebula resides 2500 light-years away in the constellation Monoceros.

The Cone is a cousin of the M16 pillars, which the Hubble telescope imaged in 1995. Consisting mainly of cold gas, the pillars in both regions resist being eroded away by the blistering ultraviolet radiation from young, massive stars. Pillars like the Cone and M16 are common in large regions of star birth. Astronomers believe that these pillars may be incubators for developing stars.

The ACS made this observation on 2 April 2002. The colour image is constructed from three separate images taken in blue, near-infrared, and hydrogen-alpha filters.

Image credit: NASA, the ACS Science Team (H. Ford, G. Illingworth, M. Clampin, G. Hartig, T. Allen, K. Anderson, F. Bartko, N. Benitez, J. Blakeslee, R. Bouwens, T. Broadhurst, R. Brown, C. Burrows, D. Campbell, E. Cheng, N. Cross, P. Feldman, M. Franx, D. Golimowski, C. Gronwall, R. Kimble, J. Krist, M. Lesser, D. Magee, A. Martel, W. J. McCann, G. Meurer, G. Miley, M. Postman, P. Rosati, M. Sirianni, W. Sparks, P. Sullivan, H. Tran, Z. Tsvetanov, R. White, and R. Woodruff) and ESA

Credit:

NASA, Holland Ford (JHU), the ACS Science Team and ESA

About the Object

Name: Cone Nebula,NGC 2264
Type: Milky Way : Nebula
Distance: 3000 light years
Constellation: Monoceros
Category: Nebulae

Coordinates

Position (RA): 6 41 12.38
Position (Dec): 9° 25′ 36.59″
Field of view: 3.43 x 2.58 arcminutes
Orientation: North is 4.2° right of vertical

The Red Spider Nebula: surfing in Sagittarius – not for the faint-hearted!

Huge waves are sculpted in this two-lobed nebula some 3000 light-years away in the constellation of Sagittarius. This warm planetary nebula harbours one of the hottest stars known and its powerful stellar winds generate waves 100 billion kilometres high. The waves are caused by supersonic shocks, formed when the local gas is compressed and heated in front of the rapidly expanding lobes. The atoms caught in the shock emit the spectacular radiation seen in this image.

Credit:

ESA & Garrelt Mellema (Leiden University, the Netherlands)

About the Object

Name: NGC 6537, Red Spider Nebula
Type: Milky Way : Nebula : Type : Planetary
Distance: 6000 light years
Constellation: Sagittarius
Category: Nebulae

Coordinates

Position (RA): 18 5 13.39
Position (Dec): -19° 50′ 32.56″
Field of view: 2.18 x 1.21 arcminutes
Orientation: North is 50.1° left of vertical

Light and shadow in the Carina Nebula

Previously unseen details of a mysterious, complex structure within the Carina Nebula (NGC 3372) are revealed by this image of the ‘Keyhole Nebula, ‘ obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. The picture is a montage assembled from four different April 1999 telescope pointings with Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, which used six different colour filters. The picture is dominated by a large, approximately circular feature, which is part of the Keyhole Nebula, named in the 19th century by Sir John Herschel. This region, about 8000 light-years from Earth, is located adjacent to the famous explosive variable star Eta Carinae, which lies just outside the field of view toward the upper right. The Carina Nebula also contains several other stars that are among the hottest and most massive known, each about 10 times as hot, and 100 times as massive, as our Sun.

Credit:

NASA/ESA, The Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI)

About the Object

Name: Carina Nebula,Keyhole Nebula
Type: Milky Way : Nebula
Distance: 7500 light years
Constellation: Carina
Category: Nebulae

Coordinates

Position (RA): 10 44 43.22
Position (Dec): -59° 38′ 56.60″
Field of view: 3.95 x 2.53 arcminutes
Orientation: North is 182.5° left of vertical

Hubble snaps close-up of the Tarantula

Hubble has taken this stunning close-up shot of part of the Tarantula Nebula. This star-forming region of ionised hydrogen gas is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small galaxy which neighbours the Milky Way. It is home to many extreme conditions including supernova remnants and the heaviest star ever found. The Tarantula Nebula is the most luminous nebula of its type  in the local Universe.

Credit:

NASA, ESA

About the Object

Name: 30 Doradus,NGC 2060, NGC 2070, Tarantula Nebula
Type: Local Universe : Nebula : Type : Star Formation
Distance: 170000 light years
Constellation: Dorado
Category: Nebulae

Coordinates

Position (RA): 5 37 44.29
Position (Dec): -69° 11′ 12.14″
Field of view: 3.23 x 3.30 arcminutes
Orientation: North is 15.8° right of vertical

Hubble captures view of “Mystic Mountain”

This craggy fantasy mountaintop enshrouded by wispy clouds looks like a bizarre landscape from Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, which is even more dramatic than fiction, captures the chaotic activity atop a pillar of gas and dust, three light-years tall, which is being eaten away by the brilliant light from nearby bright stars. The pillar is also being assaulted from within, as infant stars buried inside it fire off jets of gas that can be seen streaming from towering peaks.

This turbulent cosmic pinnacle lies within a tempestuous stellar nursery called the Carina Nebula, located 7500 light-years away in the southern constellation of Carina. The image celebrates the 20th anniversary of Hubble’s launch and deployment into an orbit around the Earth.

Scorching radiation and fast winds (streams of charged particles) from super-hot newborn stars in the nebula are shaping and compressing the pillar, causing new stars to form within it. Streamers of hot ionised gas can be seen flowing off the ridges of the structure, and wispy veils of gas and dust, illuminated by starlight, float around its towering peaks. The denser parts of the pillar are resisting being eroded by radiation.

Nestled inside this dense mountain are fledgling stars. Long streamers of gas can be seen shooting in opposite directions from the pedestal at the top of the image. Another pair of jets is visible at another peak near the centre of the image. These jets, (known as HH 901 and HH 902, respectively, are signposts for new star birth and are launched by swirling gas and dust discs around the young stars, which allow material to slowly accrete onto the stellar surfaces.

Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 observed the pillar on 1-2 February 2010. The colours in this composite image correspond to the glow of oxygen (blue), hydrogen and nitrogen (green), and sulphur (red).

Credit:

NASA, ESA, M. Livio and the Hubble 20th Anniversary Team (STScI)

About the Object

Name: Carina Nebula,HH 901, HH 902
Type: Milky Way : Nebula
Milky Way : Nebula : Type : Jet
Distance: 7500 light years
Constellation: Carina
Category: Anniversary
Nebulae

Coordinates

Position (RA): 10 44 2.38
Position (Dec): -59° 30′ 29.55″
Field of view: 1.39 x 1.28 arcminutes
Orientation: North is 165.5° left of vertical

Star birth in the extreme

Hubble’s view of the Carina Nebula shows star birth in a new level of detail. The fantasy-like landscape of the nebula is sculpted by the action of outflowing winds and scorching ultraviolet radiation from the monster stars that inhabit this inferno. In the process, these stars are shredding the surrounding material that is the last vestige of the giant cloud from which the stars were born.

The immense nebula is an estimated 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina the Keel (of the old southern constellation Argo Navis, the ship of Jason and the Argonauts, from Greek mythology).

This image is a mosaic of the Carina Nebula assembled from 48 frames taken with Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys. The Hubble images were taken in the light of ionized hydrogen. Colour information was added with data taken at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. Red corresponds to sulfur, green to hydrogen, and blue to oxygen emission.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, N. Smith (University of California, Berkeley), and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

About the Object

Name: Carina Nebula,NGC 3372
Type: Milky Way : Nebula
Distance: 7500 light years
Constellation: Carina
Category: Anniversary
Nebulae

Coordinates

Position (RA): 10 44 28.80
Position (Dec): -59° 35′ 47.49″
Field of view: 24.60 x 11.92 arcminutes
Orientation: North is 50.3° right of vertical

Ghostly reflections in the Pleiades

This image shows a dark interstellar cloud ravaged by the passage of Merope, one of the brightest stars in the Pleiades star cluster. Just as a torch beam bounces off the wall of a cave, the star is reflecting light from the surface of pitch-black clouds of cold gas laced with dust. As the nebula approaches Merope, the strong starlight shining on the dust decelerates the dust particles. The nebula is drifting through the cluster at a relative speed of roughly 11 kilometres per second.

The Hubble Space Telescope has caught the eerie, wispy tendrils of a dark interstellar cloud being destroyed by the passage of one of the brightest stars in the Pleiades star cluster. Like a flashlight beam shining off the wall of a cave, the star is reflecting light off the surface of pitch black clouds of cold gas laced with dust. These are called reflection nebulae.

Credit:

NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA), George Herbig and Theodore Simon (University of Hawaii).

About the Object

Name: Barnard’s Merope Nebula,Pleiades
Type: Milky Way : Star : Grouping : Cluster
Milky Way : Nebula : Appearance : Dark
Distance: 450 light years
Constellation: Taurus
Category: Nebulae

Coordinates

Position (RA): 3 46 19.84
Position (Dec): 23° 56′ 23.84″
Field of view: 0.49 x 0.55 arcminutes
Orientation: North is 12.9° right of vertical

The Spirograph Nebula

Glowing like a multi-faceted jewel, the planetary nebula IC 418 lies about 2000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Lepus. In this picture, the Hubble telescope reveals some remarkable textures weaving through the nebula. Their origin, however, is still uncertain.

Credit:

NASA/ESA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

About the Object

Name: IC 418, IRAS 05251-1244,Spirograph Nebula
Type: Milky Way : Nebula : Type : Planetary
Distance: 2000 light years
Constellation: Lepus
Category: Nebulae

Coordinates

Position (RA): 5 27 28.26
Position (Dec): -12° 41′ 50.23″
Field of view: 0.35 x 0.38 arcminutes
Orientation: North is 42.8° left of vertical
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