This Week’s Strangest Science News


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This Week’s Strangest Science News

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At Live Science, we delve into science news from around the world every day — and some of those stories can get a little weird. Here are some of the strangest science news articles from this week.

A new species of tardigrade (not shown here) was discovered in a parking lot in Japan.

A new species of tardigrade (not shown here) was discovered in a parking lot in Japan.

Credit: Shutterstock

Who doesn’t love tardigrades? These microscopic animals, also known as water bears, can survive just about anywhere on Earth, and a new species was recently discovered in a parking lot in Japan. [Read more about the even-weirder-than-usual tardigrades]

Majestic Denali stands roughly 20,000 feet (6,000 meters) tall and may hold up to 97 metric tons of human poop.

Majestic Denali stands roughly 20,000 feet (6,000 meters) tall and may hold up to 97 metric tons of human poop.

Credit: Shutterstock

Climbers in Alaska’s Denali National Park are facing stricter rules about disposing of their poop. New guidelines were recently introduced by the National Park Service to address the growing problem of human waste on Denali, estimated to be as much as 215,000 pounds. Climbers must now dispose of their poo at two designated areas — a ranger station or in a 14,000-foot-deep crevasse. [Read more about poop disposal on Denali]

A Nessus sphinx hawkmoth caterpillar (<i>Amphion floridensis</i>), munches on a wild grape leaf.

A Nessus sphinx hawkmoth caterpillar (Amphion floridensis), munches on a wild grape leaf.

Credit: Jayne Yack

Scientists investigated how certain types of caterpillars could make a range of unusual sounds — including whistles, pops, clicks, and buzzing. The researchers analyzed caterpillar-produced sound waves, and found that the insects made noise by forcing air through a small internal structure, like a teakettle producing a whistle. [Read more about the caterpillar communication]

An unusual white ring in the front of a woman's eyeball was the result of a rare condition. Above, an image of the patient's eye showing the ring around the edge of the cornea.

An unusual white ring in the front of a woman’s eyeball was the result of a rare condition. Above, an image of the patient’s eye showing the ring around the edge of the cornea.

Credit: The New England Journal of Medicine ©2018.

An unusual autoimmune condition produced a strange effect in a woman’s eye, generating a white circle in her cornea. [Read more about the eerie eye ring]

A male, yellow Northern cardinal perching on a branch in Mexico, Baja California.

A male, yellow Northern cardinal perching on a branch in Mexico, Baja California.

Credit: Hal Beral/Getty

The appearance of an extremely rare yellow cardinal in Alabama attracted birdwatchers eager to catch a glimpse of the unusual golden bird. Its sunny feathers are likely the result of a genetic mutation that impedes its ability to generate the chemical reactions that produce red hues. [Read more about the yellow cardinal]

Want more weird science news and discoveries? Check out these and other “Strange News” stories on Live Science!

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