This Week’s Strangest Science News


Post 8508

This Week’s Strangest Science News

https://www.livescience.com/60046-strange-science-news.html

At Live Science, we delve into science news from around the world every day — and some of those stories can get a little weird. Here are some of the strangest science news articles from this week.

Fire ants weren’t going to go softly into the night after Harvey flooded Houston. Rather, they banded together to make fire ant rafts, which are buoyant, in part, because the ants can trap air with their bodies. [Read more about the fire ant rafts, and learn how to sink them]

Fossilized eggs belonging to the Cretaceous dinosaur Heyuannia huangi hold traces of pigment hinting that they were a blue-green color. To the naked eye, they appear blackish-brown.

Fossilized eggs belonging to the Cretaceous dinosaur Heyuannia huangi hold traces of pigment hinting that they were a blue-green color. To the naked eye, they appear blackish-brown.

Credit: Copyright 2017 Wiemann et al.

About 66 million years ago, a bird-like dinosaur laid a clutch of blue-green eggs in what is now China. How do researchers know the color of these ancient eggs? They studied the pigments within them. [Read more about the dinosaurs’ colorful eggs]

Birling Gap beach and the Seven Sisters chalk cliffs, East Sussex, England.

Birling Gap beach and the Seven Sisters chalk cliffs, East Sussex, England.

Credit: Solnechnaja/Shutterstock

A strange chemical fog swept through beaches in southern England on Sunday (Aug. 27), prompting nearly 150 people to seek medical attention for stinging eyes, sore throats and vomiting. The fog disappeared on Monday, and its contents are still unknown. [Read more about the mysterious chemical fog]

Some people in California put sunscreen on their eyes, thinking it would offer protection while they gazed at last week’s solar eclipse (which was a partial eclipse in the Golden State). However, this was a bad idea: sunscreen doesn’t protect your eyes if you look at the sun, and it can sting and irritate your eyes, as well. [Read more about this sunscreen debacle]

Researchers found that Myrmoteras ants' jaws work differently than those of any other known ant.

Researchers found that Myrmoteras ants’ jaws work differently than those of any other known ant.

Credit: Steve Shattuck

This is a cool party trick: The jaws of Myrmoteras ants can snap shut in about half a millisecond. What’s more, these ants’ jaws are unique, and work differently than those of other known ant species. [Read more about these spectacular, superfast ants]

A prehistoric human skeleton in the Chan Hol Cave near Tulúm on Mexico's Yucatán peninsula.

A prehistoric human skeleton in the Chan Hol Cave near Tulúm on Mexico’s Yucatán peninsula.

Credit: Tom Poole/Liquid Junge Lab

Cryptic divers stole what may be among the oldest human skeletons in North America. The skeleton was found in an underwater cavern on Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula five years ago. Although robbers stole most of it, scientists are studying a few bones the robbers missed. [Read more about the looted, prehistoric skeleton]

Artificial intelligence provides an offbeat perspective on what lies ahead for the characters of "Game of Thrones."

Artificial intelligence provides an offbeat perspective on what lies ahead for the characters of “Game of Thrones.”

Credit: HBO

A software engineer has programmed artificial intelligence (AI) to write a new “Game of Thrones” book using the characters and style from George R.R. Martin’s hit “A Song of Ice and Fire” series. But the AI’s effort might still have a ways to go before it becomes a best-seller, especially when you take this sentence it wrote into account: “Jaime killed Cersei and was cold and full of words, and Jon thought he was the wolf now.” [Read more about the “Game of Thrones” AI]

Want more weird science news and discoveries? Check out these and other “Strange News” stories on Live Science!

Original article on Live Science.

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