Chilean Miners Rescued to day October 13, 2010 after trapped 2300 feets below surface .


Chilean Miners Trapped : Ooh God, Please Save them !!

Posted in NEWS on September 3, 2010 by mannaismayaadventure

Chile struggles to keep up morale of trapped miners

By Liz Goodwin liz Goodwin – Thu Sep 2, 2:01 pm ET

A team of four NASA employees arrived in Chile on Wednesday to help the government deal with the 33 miners who experts say will be trapped 2,300 feet below the surface for at least another three months.

Chilean President Sebastian Pinera has repeatedly stressed that he’s determined to ensure the rescue of the men — who miraculously survived when the mine collapsed Aug. 5 — no matter the cost. But there are numerous logistical challenges in sustaining the trapped crew as its members await rescue, such as simulations of day and nighttime lighting as well as preserving their strength. And the Chilean authorities have made some miscues in their efforts to orchestrate a subterranean routine.

Recently, for example, an official announced that five of the miners suffered from depression. The next day, he announced they’d been “cured.”

“That is probably not such a good idea,” Lawrence Palinkas, a University of Southern California professor of social policy, told the Guardian. “These diagnoses carry a certain stigma … and the miners have no control over the conditions which caused this — which makes it all the more important that the government protect confidentiality.”

[33 men. 600 square feet. 90-degree stagnant air: The harrowing ordeal facing miners]

More troubling, perhaps, is the government’s decision to censor the letters from loved ones that rescue workers are dropping down to the miners in an effort to maintain morale, the Guardian reports. Government psychologists are helping the loved ones craft the letters to avoid upsetting the miners; the British paper also reports that newspaper dispatches sent to the miners are  likewise being censored to omit upsetting content.

[True tales of surviving entrapment without going crazy]

It’s debatable whether such measures are a necessary precaution — experts told the Guardian that they aren’t called for, since the miners themselves know all too well that their situation is potentially dire.  Still, it’s quite clear why government officials are worried the situation could turn volatile. In addition to dealing with the trauma of being trapped thousands of feet below the surface, some of the miners are alcoholics and are now exhibiting symptoms of withdrawal, the Telegraph reports. (A Chilean health official denies this).

[For one miner’s family, unbelievable misfortune]

James Michael Duncan, a NASA doctor who just arrived to help the miners, denied the group’s request that wine and cigarettes be sent down with their supplies. They will receive nicotine patches instead.

[What’s the space agency got to do with a mining disaster? |Astronauts’ advice for miners]

“These miners showed us tremendous strength in surviving as long as they did without any contact with the surface,” he told the paper. “What we want to try to avoid is any kind of situation of hopelessness on the part of the miners.”

On Wednesday, miners had their first hot meal — meatballs and rice — since becoming trapped. Now the focus is on giving them a sense of routine as they await their long rescue.


Video frame grab via Reuters

“The most important thing we’re doing right now from the psychological point of view is to simulate conditions of day, night, and separating the space where they’re living into zones,” Health Minister Jaime Manalich told Agence France Press.

LED lights will be set up to simulate day and night, and a strict eating and sleeping schedule will be put in place.

There’s a practical as well as psychological reason that the miners will need a normal, structured routine during their captivity: They’ll need all their strength to help with the rescue.

[LiveScience: The technologies that will save the miners]

They will have to move 3,000 tons of rock on around-the-clock shifts for months, reports Sky News: After about a month of drilling, rock will begin to fall where the miners are, and they will have to constantly clear the rock if they don’t want to become trapped again.

Meanwhile, the company that owns the mine says it may go bankrupt,meaning the trapped miners would not be paid while awaiting rescue, since the Chilean government has said it can’t pay the wages.

(Photo of Chilean miners carrying an effigy of the patron saint of miners, Saint Lorenzo: AP)

Worker checks drill machine, Xtrata 950

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A worker checks a drill machine, the Xtrata 950 (C), that will dig an escape hole from the top of a hill where 33 miners are trapped underground in a copperand gold mine at Copiapo, some 725 km (450 miles) north of Santiago August 30, 2010. Chile was looking at ways to speed up the rescue of the miners trapped deep underground for 25 days who officials have said might have to wait three to four months to see the light of day.« Read less

REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE – Tags: ENERGY DISASTER ENVIRONMENT)

Cristian Segovia

Cristian Segovia, son of trapped miner Dario Segovia, sits at the camp where relatives wait outside the collapsed San Jose mine in Copiapo, Chile, TuesdayAug. 31, 2010. Thirty-three men stuck far underground are now the longest-trapped miners in recent history as a huge drill begins digging a planned escape route. The miners have been trapped since Aug. 5.« Read less

(AP Photo/Roberto Candia)4

Rescuers install hydraulic bore, Australian-made …

Rescuers install the hydraulic bore, an Australian-made Strata 950, that will dig down to the 33 miners who are holed up in a refuge annexed to a tunnel700 metres below ground in the San Jose gold and copper mine in Copiapo.« Read less

(AFP/Ariel Marinkovic)

Trapped miners are seen of Santiago

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Trapped miners are seen underground in a copper and gold mine at Copiapo, some 725 km (450 miles) north of Santiago, in this frame grab taken August 29,2010. Chile was looking at ways to speed up the rescue of 33 miners trapped deep underground for 24 days who officials have said might have to wait three to four months to see the light of day. REUTERS/Chilean Mining Ministry/Handout (CHILE – Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY DISASTER) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS« Read less

This TV grab taken from a video released Sunday, …

This TV grab taken from a video released Sunday, Aug. 29, 2010, by Chile’s Government shows one of 33 trapped miners inside the San Jose mine in Copiapo,Chile, Saturday, Aug. 28, 2010. The miners, who have been trapped since the shaft they were working in collapsed on Aug. 5, were confirmed to be alive Sunday when they were reached by rescue teams via a small hole through which they could pass messages and see the miners with a camera.« Read less

(AP Photo/Chile’s Government Video)

Relative of one of miners

A relative of one of the miners trapped underground lights a candle outside the mine at Copiapo, some 725 km (450 miles) north of Santiago August 29, 2010.Chile is looking at ways to speed up the rescue of 33 miners trapped deep underground for 24 days who officials have said might have to wait three to four months to see the light of day. REUTERS/Pascal Parra « Read less

(CHILE – Tags: BUSINESS ENERGY DISASTER ENVIRONMENT IMAGES OF THE DAY)

Workers lower tube that is used

Workers lower a tube that is used for sending supplies to miners trapped in a deep underground copper and gold mine at Copiapo, some 725 km (450 miles)north of Santiago August 29, 2010. Chile was looking at ways on Saturday to speed up the rescue of 33 miners trapped deep underground for 23 days who officials have said might have to wait three to four months to see the light of day.« Read less

REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE – Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)

Workers stand by pipe that keeps

Workers stand by the pipe that keeps communication open with 33 miners who are trapped inside the collapsed San Jose mine in Copiapo, Chile, Sunday Aug.29, 2010. The trapped miners half mile underground will have to aid their own escape clearing tons of rock that will fall as the rescue hole is drilled, the engineer in charge of drilling said Sunday. The mine collapsed on Aug. 5.« Read less

(AP Photo/Roberto Candia)

Members of press stand

Members of the press stand by the pipe used to keep communication open with 33 miners trapped alive in the collapsed San Jose mine in Copiapo, Chile, SundayAug. 29, 2010. The trapped miners half mile underground will have to aid their own escape by clearing rock that will fall as the rescue hole is drilled, the engineer in charge of drilling said Sunday. The mine collapsed on Aug. 5.« Read less

(AP Photo/Roberto Candia)

Chilean Minister of Mining Laurence Goldborne

Chilean Minister of Mining Laurence Goldborne (L) opens a “dove”, a rocket-shaped metal tube which is used to send supplies to the trapped miners,at the San Jose gold and copper mine. The men have been trapped underground since an August 5 cave-in that blocked their exit from the mine, and have been receiving food and other items passed though narrow bore holes.« Read less

(AFP/Ariel Marinkovic)

Devotees carry religious statue

Devotees carry a religious statue during a prayer service for the trapped miners, at the San Jose gold and copper mine in Copiapo, north of Santiago onAugust 29, 2010. The 33 men were to finally hear the voices of their loved ones in their first phone contact with relatives since they were discovered alive.« Read less

(AFP/Ariel Marinkovic)

Relatives of 33 miners

Relatives of the 33 miners place Chilean national flags on a slope of the mine on Friday. Chilean rescuers will begin Monday the months-long task of drillinga shaft to rescue 33 miners trapped deep underground, as officials draft an accelerated rescue plan.« Read less

(AFP/Martin Bernetti)

Computer screen shows one

A computer screen shows one of the miners trapped underground in a copper and gold mine, inside the mine at Copiapo, some 725 km (450 miles) north of SantiagoAugust 26, 2010. Thirty-three miners trapped for 21 days in a Chilean mine may get videos of Maradona and other soccer greats to beat boredom as they face several months deep underground until they are dug out. Picture taken August 26, 2010.« Read less

REUTERS/Ivan Alvarado (CHILE – Tags: SOCIETY ENVIRONMENT DISASTER)

People pray at camp where relatives wait

People pray at the camp where relatives of 33 trapped miners wait outside the collapsed San Jose mine in Copiapo, Chile, Friday Aug. 27, 2010. The miners,who have been trapped since the shaft they were working in collapsed on Aug. 5, were confirmed to be alive Sunday when they were reached by rescue teams via a small hole through which they could pass messages and see the miners with a camera.« Read less

(AP Photo/Roberto Candia)

Women light candles next representing miners

Women light candles next to Chilean flags representing trapped 33 miners outside the San Jose mine in Copiapo, Chile, Wednesday, Aug. 25, 2010. The miners,who have been trapped since the shaft they were working in collapsed on Aug. 5, were confirmed to be alive Sunday when they were reached by rescue teams via a hole through which they could pass messages, supplies, air, and see the miners with a camera.« Read less

(AP Photo/Roberto Candia)

Chile rescue capsule lowered into shaft for tests

Top of Form

AP – Rescue workers and officials test the rescue capsule that will be used to extract the 33 trapped miners …


By MICHAEL WARREN, Associated Press Writer – 11 mins ago

Publish October 13th, 2010  08.30 am, by mannaismaya

SAN JOSE MINE, Chile – Rescuers in Chile are lowering a still-empty escape capsule into the shaft that will finally provide a way out for 33 trapped miners.

Last-minute adjustments had to be made to systems that will enable communication between the miners and the surface during their trips.

President Sebastian Pinera met with the rescuers who will soon descend into the mine, and he patted the side of the capsule, standing in the clouds of steam rushing up from the mine where the men have endured sauna-like conditions for 69 days.

A huge spool of thick steel cable is holding the capsule. After the tests, they plan to send rescuers down and then first miners up. Mining Minister Laurence Golborne still hopes to have the first miner out before midnight.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP’s earlier story is below.

SAN JOSE MINE, Chile (AP) — Chilean officials prepared to lower two rescuers almost a half-mile into a collapsed mine Tuesday, the precursor to fresh air and freedom for 33 men trapped for 69 days. No one in history has been trapped underground so long and survived.

“We made a promise to never surrender, and we kept it,” PresidentSebastian Pinera said as he waited to greet the miners, whose endurance and unity captivated the world as Chile meticulously prepared their rescue.

AP/Natacha Pisarenko

Mining Minister Laurence Golborne said a paramedic will begin descending to start the rescue of 33 trapped miners by about 10 p.m. local time (9 p.m. EDT) — two hours later than what President Sebastian Pinera had previously announced. Goldborne said that’s because more testing is needed once cables and equipment are attached to the custom-built capsule that will carry the men.

A mine rescue expert will be lowered in the capsule and raised again to test it, and then that rescuer and a Navy special forces paramedic will be lowered to the men to prepare them for the trip. Only then can the first miner be pulled to safety. It is expected to take as many as 36 hours for the last miner to be rescued.

Chile has taken extensive precautions to ensure the miners’ privacy, using a screen to block the top of the shaft from more than 1,000 journalists at the scene.

The miners will be ushered through an inflatable tunnel, like those used in sports stadiums, to an ambulance for a trip of several hundred yards (meters) to a triage station for an immediate medical check. They will gather with a few family members, in an area also closed to the media, before being transported by helicopter to a hospital.

Each ride up the shaft is expected to take about 20 minutes, and authorities expect they will be able to haul up roughly one miner per hour. When the last man surfaces, it promises to end a national crisis that began when 700,000 tons of rock collapsed on Aug. 5, sealing the miners into the lower reaches of the gold andcopper mine.

The only media allowed to record them coming out of the shaft will be a government photographer and Chile’s state television channel, whose live broadcast will be delayed by 30 seconds or more to prevent the release of anything unexpected.

The worst technical problem that could happen, rescue coordinator Andre Sougarett told The Associated Press, is that “a rock could fall,” potentially jamming the capsule partway up the shaft. But test rides suggest the ride up will be smooth.

Panic attacks are the rescuers’ biggest concern. The miners will not be sedated — they need to be alert in case something goes wrong. If a miner must get out more quickly, rescuers will accelerate the capsule to a maximum 3 meters per second, Health Minister Jaime Manalich said.

The rescue attempt is risky simply because no one else has ever tried to extract miners from such depths, Davitt McAteer, who directed the U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration during the Clinton administration. A miner could get claustrophobic and do something that damages the capsule. Or a rock could fall and wedge it in the shaft. Or the cable could get hung up. Or the rig that pulls the cable could overheat.

“You can be good and you can be lucky. And they’ve been good and lucky,” McAteer told the AP. “Knock on wood that this luck holds out for the next 33 hours.”

Golborne, whose management of the crisis has made him a media star in Chile, said authorities had already thought of everything.

“There is no need to try to start guessing what could go wrong. We have done that job,” Golborne said. “We have hundreds of different contingencies.”

As for the miners, Manalich said, “It remains a paradox — they’re actually much more relaxed than we are.”

Rescuers finished reinforcing the top of the 2,041-foot (622-meter) escape shaft early Monday, and the 13-foot (four-meter) tall capsule descended flawlessly in test runs. The capsule — the biggest of three built by Chilean navy engineers — was named Phoenix I for the mythical bird that rises from ashes and is painted in the white, blue and red of the Chilean flag.

The miners were to be closely monitored from the moment they’re strapped into the claustrophobic steel tube to be hauled up the smooth-walled tunnel. They were given a special high-calorie liquid diet prepared and donated by NASA, designed to keep them from vomiting as the rescue capsule rotates 10 to 12 times through curves in the 28-inch-diameter escape hole.

Engineers inserted steel piping at the top of the shaft. They stopped short of initial plans for the sleeve after it became jammed during a probe of the curved top of the hole, which is angled 11 degrees off vertical at its top before plunging like a waterfall. Drillers had to curve the shaft so that it would pass through “virgin” rock, narrowly avoiding collapsed areas and underground open spaces in the overexploited mine, which had operated since 1885.

A small video camera is in the escape capsule, trained on each miner’s face for panic attacks. The miners will wear oxygen masks and have two-way voice communication.

Their pulse, skin temperature and respiration rate will be constantly measured through a biomonitor around their abdomens. To prevent blood clotting from the quick ascent, they took aspirin and will wear compression socks.

The miners will also wear sweaters because they’ll experience a shift in climate from about 90 degrees Fahrenheit underground to temperatures hovering near freezing after night falls. Those coming out during daylight hours will wear sunglasses.

Seconds before each miner surfaces, an ambulance-like siren will sound and a light will flash for a full minute. Officials are calling this the Genesis alarm, meant simply to alert doctors that a miner is arriving.

Many steps have been taken to protect the emerging miners from the media. Photographers and camera operators will be able to see light but little more from a platform set up more than 300 feet (90 meters) away.

After initial medical checks and visits with family members selected by the miners, the men will be airlifted to the regional hospital in Copiapo, roughly a 10-minute ride away. Two floors have been prepared where the miners will receive physical and psychological exams and be kept under observation in a ward as dark as a movie theater.

Chilean air force Lt. Col. Aldo Carbone, the choppers’ squadron commander, said the pilots have night-vision goggles but will not fly unless it is clear of the notoriously thick Pacific Ocean fog that rolls in at night.

Families were urged to wait and prepare to greet the miners at home after a 48-hour hospital stay. Manalich also said that no cameras or interviews will be allowed until the miners are released, unless the miners expressly desire it.

Officials have drawn up a secret list of which miners should come out first, but the order could change after paramedics and a mining expert first descend in the capsule to evaluate the men. First out will be the four miners best able to handle any difficulties and tell their comrades what to expect. Then, the 10 who are weakest or suffer from hypertension, diabetes, dental and respiratory infections and skin lesions from the mine’s oppressive humidity.

The first miner to be rescued will be Florencio Avalos, according to his mother, Maria Silva, and uncle Alberto Avalos, who said Pinera told them that.

The last miner out, according the list, will be shift foreman Luiz Urzua, whose leadership was credited for the miners’ survival during the 17 days when they were utterly closed off from the outside world. The men stretched an emergency food supply meant to last just 48 hours by taking tiny sips of milk and bites of tuna fish every other day.

Several of Urzua’s relatives told the AP that he was last on the list, speaking on condition of anonymity to avoid upsetting government officials.

“He’s a very good guy — he keeps everybody’s spirits up and is so responsible — he’s going to see this through to the end,” said his neighbor Angelica Vicencio, who has led a nightly vigil outside the Urzua home in Copiapo.

U.S. President Barack Obama issued a statement praising the efforts of rescuers, including many Americans. “While that rescue is far from over and difficult work remains, we pray that by God’s grace, the miners will be able to emerge safely and return to their families soon,” he said.

Chile has promised that its care of the miners won’t end for six months at least — not until they can be sure that each miner has readjusted.

Psychiatrists and other experts in surviving extreme situations predict their lives will be anything but normal.

Since Aug. 22, when a narrow bore hole broke through to their refuge and the miners stunned the world with a note, scrawled in red pen, that announced their survival, these families’ lives have been exposed in ways they never imagined. Miners had to describe their physical and mental health in minute detail with teams of doctors and psychologists. And in some cases, when both wives and lovers claimed the same man, everyone involved had to face the consequences.

By the time of the rescue, nerves were beyond frayed outside the mine in “Camp Hope,” where miners’families and reporters from all over the world slept side by side in tents and campers, enduring the baking days and frigid nights of the desolate Atacama desert.

Alberto Iturra, chief of the psychology team, told the families to go home, get some rest, and prepare to reunite in several days.

“I explained to the families that the only way one can receive someone is to first be home to open the door,” Iturra said.

Salute to all Rescuers, May God Bless You (Yappy – Mannaismaya Blog)

Associated Press Writers Frank Bajak and Vivian Sequera contributed to this report.

By MICHAEL WARREN, Associated Press Writer – 17 mins ago, and publish at 02.30 pm to day to this blog.

SAN JOSE MINE, Chile – To hugs, cheers and tears, rescuers using a missile-like escape capsule began pulling 33 men one by one to fresh air and freedom at last early Wednesday, 69 days after they were trapped in a collapsed mine almost a half-mile underground.

Four men were pulled out in the early hours of the operation in the Chilean desert — a drama in which the world was captivated by the miners’ endurance and unity as officials meticulously prepared their rescue.

Rescued first was Florencio Avalos, who wore a helmet and sunglasses to protect him from the glare of bright lights. He smiled broadly as he emerged and hugged his sobbing 7-year-old son, Bairon, and wife, then got a bearhug from Chilean President Sebastian Pinera shortly after midnight local time.

Florencio Avalos, the first miner to be rescued, center, is greeted after his rescue Tuesday, Oct. 12, 2010 at San Jose Mine near Copiapo, Chile.

A video grab shows family members of Florencio Avalos, the first of 33 workers trapped for more than two months in a Chilean mine, wife Monica (C) andson Iaino (2nd L) moving in to embrace Avalos upon ascending to surface at San Jose mine in Copiapo, October 13, 2010. The first of 33 workers trapped for more than two months in a Chilean mine reached the surface early Wednesday morning in a specially-made rescue capsule. REUTERS/Government of Chile/Pool « Read less

(CHILE – Tags: DISASTER ENERGY BUSINESS IMAGES OF THE DAY)

Chile’s President Sebastian Pinera, right, looks on as miner Florencio Antonio Avalos Silva embraces his wife Monica after he was rescued from the collapsed San Jose gold and copper mine where he was trapped with 32 other miners for over two months near Copiapo, Chile, early Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010.

A second miner, Mario Sepulveda Espina, was pulled to the surface about an hour later — his shouts heard even before the capsule surfaced. After hugging his wife, Elvira, he jubilantly handed souvenir rocks from his underground prison to laughing rescuers.

Then he jumped up and down as if to prove his strength to everyone before the medical team took him into a triage unit.

A third Chilean miner, Juan Illanes, followed after another hour, and then the lone Bolivian, Carlos Mamani, was pulled out.

In this photo released by the Chilean presidential press office, Bolivian miner Carlos Mamani Solis, left, is hugged by Chile’s President Sebastian Pineraafter being rescued from the collapsed San Jose gold and copper mine where he was trapped with 32 other miners for over two months near Copiapo, Chile, early Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2010.«

Mamani was greeted by his wife, Veronica, with a hug and kiss that knocked off her white hardhat as Chile’s president and first lady held small Bolivian flags. Mamani also gestured with both forefingers at the Chilean flag on his T-shirt and shouted “Gracias, Chile!” before a round of backslapping with rescuers.

Click image to see photos of the rescue efforts


Reuters/Ivan Alvarado

Through the first four rescues, the operation held to a schedule announced earlier to get all the miners out in about 36 hours.

When the last man surfaces, it promises to end a national crisis that began when 700,000 tons of rock collapsed Aug. 5, sealing the men in the lower reaches of the mine.

After the first capsule came out of the manhole-sized opening, Avalos emerged as bystanders cheered, clapped and broke into a chant of “Chi! Chi! Chi! Le! Le! Le!” — the country’s name.

Avalos gave a thumbs-up as he was led to an ambulance and medical tests following his more than two months deep below the Chilean desert — the longest anyone has ever been trapped underground and survived.

Avalos, the 31-year-old second-in-command of the miners, was chosen to be first because he was in the best condition. He has been so shy that he volunteered to handle the camera rescuers sent down so he wouldn’t have to appear on the videos that the miners sent up.

Pinera later explained they had not planned for Avalos’ family to join rescuers at the opening of the shaft, but that little Bairon insisted on being there.

“I told Florencio that few times have I ever seen a son show so much love for his father,” the president said.

“This won’t be over until all 33 are out,” he added. “Hopefully the spirit of these miners will remain forever with us. … This country is capable of great things.”

Minutes earlier, mine rescue expert Manuel Gonzalez of the state copper company Codelco grinned and made the sign of the cross as he was lowered to the trapped men — apparently without incident. He was followed by Roberto Rios, a paramedic with the Chilean navy’s special forces, who helped prepare the miners for rescue.

“We made a promise to never surrender, and we kept it,” Pinera said as he waited to greet the miners, whose endurance and unity captivated the world as Chile meticulously prepared their rescue.

The last miner out has been decided: Shift foreman Luis Urzua, whose leadership was credited for helping the men endure 17 days with no outside contact after the collapse. The men made 48 hours’ worth of rations last before rescuers reached them with a narrow borehole to send down more food.

Janette Marin, sister-in-law of miner Dario Segovia, said the order of rescue didn’t matter.

“This won’t be a success unless they all get out,” she said, echoing the solidarity that the miners and people across Chile have expressed.

The paramedics can change the order of rescue based on a brief medical check once they’re in the mine. First out will be those best able to handle any difficulties and tell their comrades what to expect. Then, the weakest and the ill — in this case, about 10 suffer from hypertension, diabetes, dental and respiratory infections and skin lesions from the mine’s oppressive humidity. The last should be people who are both physically fit and strong of character.

Chile has taken extensive precautions to ensure the miners’ privacy, using a screen to block the top of the shaft from the more than 1,000 journalists at the scene.

The miners were ushered through a tunnel built of metal containers to an ambulance for a trip of several hundred yards (meters) to a triage station for a medical check. They will then be taken by helicopter to a hospital.

The only media allowed to record them coming out of the shaft will be a government photographer and Chile’s state TV channel, whose live broadcast was delayed by 30 seconds or more to prevent the release of anything unexpected. Photographers and camera operators were on a platform more than 300 feet (90 meters) away.

The worst technical problem that could happen, rescue coordinator Andre Sougarett told The Associated Press, is that “a rock could fall,” potentially jamming the capsule partly up the shaft.

Panic attacks are the rescuers’ biggest concern. The miners will not be sedated — they need to be alert in case something goes wrong. If a miner must get out more quickly, rescuers will accelerate the capsule to a maximum 3 meters per second, Health Minister Jaime Manalich said.

The rescue is risky simply because no one else has ever tried to extract miners from such depths, said Davitt McAteer, who directed the U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration in the Clinton administration. A miner could get claustrophobic and do something to damage the capsule. Or a falling rock could wedge it in the shaft. Or the cable could get hung up. Or the rig that pulls the cable could overheat.

“You can be good and you can be lucky. And they’ve been good and lucky,” McAteer told the AP. “Knock on wood that this luck holds out for the next 33 hours.”

Mining Minister Laurence Golborne, whose management of the crisis has made him a media star in Chile, said authorities had already thought of everything.

“There is no need to try to start guessing what could go wrong. We have done that job,” Golborne said. “We have hundreds of different contingencies.”

As for the miners, Manalich said, “It remains a paradox — they’re actually much more relaxed than we are.”

Rescuers finished reinforcing the top of the 2,041-foot (622-meter) escape shaft Monday, and the 13-foot (four-meter) capsule descended flawlessly in tests. The capsule — the biggest of three built by Chilean navy engineers — was named Phoenix for the mythical bird that rises from ashes. It is painted in the white, blue and red of the Chilean flag.

The miners were to be closely monitored from the moment they’re strapped in the capsule. They were given a high-calorie liquid diet donated by NASA, designed to keep them from vomiting as the capsule rotates 10 to 12 times through curves in the 28-inch-diameter escape hole.

A video camera in the escape capsule watched for panic attacks. The miners have oxygen masks and two-way voice communication.

Their pulse, skin temperature and respiration rate are constantly measured through a monitor around their abdomens. To prevent blood clotting from the quick ascent, they took aspirin and wore compression socks.

The miners also had sweaters for the shift in climate from about 90 degrees underground to near freezing on the surface after nightfall.

Engineers inserted steel piping at the top of the shaft, which is angled 11 degrees off vertical before plunging like a waterfall. Drillers had to curve the shaft to pass through “virgin” rock, narrowly avoiding collapsed areas and underground open spaces in the overexploited mine, which had operated since 1885.

After medical checks and visits with family members selected by the miners, the men will be flown to the hospital in Copiapo, a 10-minute ride away. Two floors were prepared where the miners will receive physical and psychological exams and be kept under observation in a ward as dark as a movie theater.

Chilean air force Lt. Col. Aldo Carbone said helicopter pilots were issued night-vision goggles but won’t fly unless it is clear of the thick Pacific Ocean fog that rolls in at night.

Families were urged to wait and prepare to greet the miners at home after a 48-hour hospital stay. Manalich said no cameras or interviews will be allowed until the miners are released, unless the miners expressly desire it.

Neighbors looked forward to barbecues and parties to replace the vigils held since their friends were trapped.

Urzua’s neighbors told the AP he probably insisted on being the last one up.

“He’s a very good guy — he keeps everybody’s spirits up and is so responsible — he’s going to see this through to the end,” said neighbor Angelica Vicencio, who has led a nightly vigil outside the Urzua home in Copiapo.

U.S. President Barack Obama praised rescuers, who include many Americans. “While that rescue is far from over and difficult work remains, we pray that by God’s grace, the miners will be able to emerge safely and return to their families soon,” he said.

Chile has promised that its care of the miners won’t end for six months at least — not until they can be sure that each miner has readjusted.

Psychiatrists and other experts in surviving extreme situations predict their lives will be anything but normal.

Since Aug. 22, when a narrow bore hole broke through to their refuge and the miners stunned the world with a note, scrawled in red ink, disclosing their survival, their families have been exposed in ways they never imagined. Miners had to describe their physical and mental health in detail with teams of doctors and psychologists. In some cases, when both wives and lovers claimed the same man, everyone involved had to face the consequences.

___

Associated Press writers Frank Bajak and Vivian Sequera contributed to this report.

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The World’s Largest Omelete made by Turkish Chef


The World’s Largest Omelete made by Turkish Chef  

Posted: 11 Oct 2010 08:25 PM PDT


The New Records of World’s Largest Omelette will be completed by

50 turkish chef. In an attempt to promote eggs as a healthy and cheap

food source, and celebrate World Egg Day, Turkish chefs managed

to set a new world record for the World’s Largest Omelette.

50 Turkish cooks, along with 1o chefs whisked 110,010 eggs on a giant

fryer, 10 meters in diameter. The omelette took 2.5 hours to cook,

but I bet the people involved could think of no better way to celebrate

World Egg Day. 432 liters of oil were needed to make this larger

-than-life-dish nice and fluffy. The event was staged by

the Turkish Egg Producers Association as a way of promoting eggs

as a tasty and healthy meal.

The giant omelette weighed 4.4 tons, beating the old record of

3.625 tons, by almost a ton. After the offcial weighing, the omlette

was served to the thousands of by-standers attracted by the smell.

You can also watch the making of the world’s largest omelette below.







World’s Longest Electric Bicycle 

Posted: 11 Oct 2010 08:10 PM PDT


China made a new records for the world’s longest electric bicycle.

This invention Showcased during the Zhejiang International

Bicycle Electric-Cycle Exhibition, this 5.2 meters long electric

bicycle can seat eight people and its manufacturer has already

applied for the World’s Longest Electric Bike Guinness Record.

Beside this long electric bicycle you can also find another

bizarre and weird bicycle models on our previous post about

Most Creative Bicycle models and the futuristic bicycle concept.

Here’s another picture of the world’s longest electric bicycle