Ambitious Teen Sailors Stir Safety Debate


Laura Dekker

Laura Dekker poses for the media on her boat Guppy in Den Osse, south-west Netherlands, Tuesday, July 27, 2010. A Dutch court has cleared the way for 14-year-old Laura Dekker to set sail on a risky solo voyage around the world. Judges at Middelburg’s family court have lifted a guardianship order imposed on Dekker last year after she said she wanted to set sail alone around the world.

 14-year-old Laura Dekker has Dutch court’s — and her mom’s — permission to sail around the world

Laura Dekker has convinced a Dutch court that she’s done her sailing homework and is ready to attempt to beat Jessica Watson’s record around-the-world solo sail.

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Global-News/2010/0727/14-year-old-Laura-Dekker-has-Dutch-court-s-and-her-mom-s-permission-to-sail-around-the-world

Laura Dekker, the Dutch girl who won a 10-month legal battle Tuesday in her bid to become the youngest person to sail solo around the world, was born on a similar sea voyage 14 years ago.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/netherlands/7913481/Dutch-girl-Laura-Dekker-wins-fight-to-sail-round-world-profile.html

http://www.ctpost.com/news/articleGallery/Dutch-sailor-14-gets-OK-for-solo-world-trip-591797.php

Peter de Lange, lawyer of Laura Dekker, answers questions of the media at the courtroom in Middelburg, south-west Netherlands, Tuesday, July 27, 2010.A Dutch court has cleared the way for 14-year-old Laura Dekker to set sail on a risky solo voyage around the world. Judges at Middelburg’s family court have lifted a guardianship order imposed on Dekker last year after she said she wanted to set sail alone around the world. Dekker was not in court for Tuesday’s decision.

  Dick Dekker, father of Dutch teenage sailor Laura Dekker whose round-the-world voyage was blocked by the courts, smiles while giving his statement to the media at the courtroom in Utrecht, the Netherlands December 23, 2009.

*** Salute and two thumbs for you Laura***

   ***     from Manna Ismaya Adventure Team ***

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Iowa’s Lake Delhi Dam Break


Reuters – Waters burst through the broken Lake Delhi dam in Northeastern Iowa, in this handout photograph taken …

By MICHAEL J. CRUMB, Associated Press Writer Michael J. Crumb, Associated Press Writer – Mon Jul 26, 5:33 pm ET

DES MOINES, Iowa – Acres of mud strewn with dead fish greeted hundreds of eastern Iowa residents Monday after a weekend dam break left their lakefront properties overlooking little more than a small stream.

The Lake Delhi dam in Delaware County gave way under the rapidly rising Maquoketa River on Saturday, decimating the nine-mile-long lake and adjacent property values.

“The water’s gone, dead fish are laying there on the bottom — it’s a pretty nasty looking scene,” said Irv Janey of Marion, who owns a condominium on Lake Delhi. “It was a beautiful recreation area and to see it drained, it just makes you sick.”

Heavy rains last week forced the river to unprecedented levels, causing earthen portions of the dam to collapse and sending a torrent of water rushing downstream. The concrete section of the dam remained intact, but the swollen river damaged about half the 1,000 homes and cabins above it. The lake quickly emptied.

“We have over $100 million in homes on the lake and none of them are worth what they were when they had water in front of them,” said Jim Willey, director of the Lake Delhi Recreation Association. “You have a home with a lake or a home with a mud flat.

“What might have been a $500,000 house is probably worth only a quarter of what it once was.”

Property owners clearly hope the lake will be restored. But it is up to the association to decide whether to rebuild the dam, built in 1927 to produce hydroelectricity. The lake is now used solely for recreation and the association members pay dues to maintain it.

Board members were meeting with local, state and federal officials Monday, Willey said. He said the group is committed to recovering the lake, but acknowledged funding could be a major obstacle and any plan would be on hold until officials know whether a federal disaster declaration will be granted.

Iowa Homeland Security and Emergency Management Director David Miller said the Lake Delhi dam likely will be eligible for federal assistance because it received aid after major flooding in 2008. If approved, the Federal Emergency Management Agency would pay 75 percent of dam’s costs. The state would pay 10 percent and local government would have to pay the 15 percent balance, Miller said.

Miller said any publicly funded efforts would receive close scrutiny.

“When we do repair projects, they are often subject to environmental reviews and maybe a historic review and maybe other regulatory reviews depending on where they get their funding,” he said.

Work to refurbish the dam, damaged by flooding in 2008, actually was under way when it collapsed, Willey said.

“More water came down than ever had been planned before,” he said. “Things were different when it was built, the watersheds were different, field drainage was different, we’re working with a situation that the designers of the dam couldn’t have foreseen.”

Downstream in Monticello, the water from the Maquoketa River was receding Monday. About 50 homes and 20 businesses took on water over the weekend after the dam collapsed.

Water remained in some flooded areas but had fallen dramatically from reaching the eaves of at least one business Saturday, said Brenda Leonard, the Jones County emergency management coordinator.

Leonard said the county relies on the Lake Delhi dam for river level measurements and were isolated after the dam broke. There are no river gauges between Manchester to the north and Maquoketa to the south, she said.

“We had no idea what was coming,” she said. The state patrol had to fly over the area to alert officials what was headed their way, she added.

Back at the now-barren lake, residents were left with little to do but wait.

Hachiko The Faithful Dog


Hachikō

Hachikō

Species

Dog

Breed

Akita Inu

Sex Male

Born November 10, 1923

near the city of Ōdate, Akita Prefecture

Died March 8, 1935 (aged 11)

Shibuya, Tokyo

Resting place National Science Museum of Japan in Ueno, Tokyo.

Nation from Japan

Owner Hidesaburō Ueno

Appearance

golden brown with cream color on upper face

Hachikō (ハチ公?, November 10, 1923–March 8, 1935), known in Japanese as chūken Hachikō (忠犬ハチ公?, “faithful dog Hachikō” (‘hachi’ meaning ‘eight’, a number referring to the dog’s birth order in the litter, and ‘kō,’ meaning prince or duke)). Hachikō was an Akita dog born on a farm near the city of Ōdate, Akita Prefecture,[1] remembered for his loyalty to his owner, even many years after his owner’s death.

In 1924, Hidesaburō Ueno, a professor in the agriculture department at the University of Tokyo took in Hachikō as a pet. During his owner’s life Hachikō saw him out from the front door and greeted him at the end of the day at the nearby Shibuya Station. The pair continued their daily routine until May 1925, when Professor Ueno did not return on the usual train one evening. The professor had suffered from a cerebral hemorrhage at the university that day. He died and never returned to the train station where his friend was waiting. Hachikō was loyal and every day for the next nine years he waited sitting there amongst the town’s folk.

Hachikō was given away after his master’s death, but he routinely escaped, showing up again and again at his old home. Eventually, Hachikō apparently realized that Professor Ueno no longer lived at the house. So he went to look for his master at the train station where he had accompanied him so many times before. Each day, Hachikō waited for Professor Ueno to return. And each day he did not see his friend among the commuters at the station.

The permanent fixture at the train station that was Hachikō attracted the attention of other commuters. Many of the people who frequented the Shibuya train station had seen Hachikō and Professor Ueno together each day. They brought Hachikō treats and food to nourish him during his wait.

This continued for nine years with Hachikō appearing precisely when the train was due at the station.[2]

That same year, another of Ueno’s faithful students (who had become something of an expert on the Akita breed) saw the dog at the station and followed him to the Kobayashi home (the home of the former gardener of Professor Ueno — Kikuzaboro Kobayashi[3]) where he learned the history of Hachikō’s life. Shortly after this meeting, the former student published a documented census of Akitas in Japan. His research found only 30 purebred Akitas remaining, including Hachikō from Shibuya Station.

Professor Ueno’s former student returned frequently to visit the dog and over the years published several articles about Hachikō’s remarkable loyalty. In 1932 one of these articles, published in Tokyo’s largest newspaper, threw the dog into the national spotlight. Hachikō became a national sensation. His faithfulness to his master’s memory impressed the people of Japan as a spirit of family loyalty all should strive to achieve. Teachers and parents used Hachikō’s vigil as an example for children to follow. A well-known Japanese artist rendered a sculpture of the dog, and throughout the country a new awareness of the Akita breed grew.

Eventually, Hachiko’s legendary faithfulness became a national symbol of loyalty.

Hachikō died on March 8, 1935. He was found on a street in Shibuya.[4] His heart was infected with filarial worms and 3-4 yakitori sticks were found in his stomach.[5] His stuffed and mounted remains are kept at the National Science Museum of Japan in Ueno, Tokyo.[6]

In April 1934, a bronze statue in his likeness was erected at Shibuya Station ( 35°39′32.6″N 139°42′2.1″E35.659056°N 139.700583°E), and Hachikō himself was present at its unveiling. The statue was recycled for the war effort during World War II. In 1948 The Society for Recreating the Hachikō Statue commissioned Takeshi Ando, son of the original artist who had since died, to make a second statue. The new statue, which was erected in August 1948, still stands and is an extremely popular meeting spot. The station entrance near this statue is named “Hachikō-guchi”, meaning “The Hachikō Exit”, and is one of Shibuya Station’s five exits.

The Japan Times played a practical joke on readers by reporting that the bronze statue was stolen a little before 2AM on April 1, 2007, by “suspected metal thieves”. The false story told a very detailed account of an elaborate theft by men wearing khaki workers’ uniforms who secured the area with orange safety cones and obscured the theft with blue vinyl tarps. The “crime” was allegedly recorded on security cameras.

A similar statue stands in Hachikō’s hometown, in front of Ōdate Station. In 2004, a new statue of Hachikō was erected on the original stone pedestal from Shibuya in front of the Akita Dog Museum in Odate.

Each year on April 8, Hachikō’s devotion is honored with a solemn ceremony of remembrance at Tokyo’s Shibuya railroad station. Hundreds of dog lovers often turn out to honor his memory and loyalty.[7][8]

Hachikō exhibited at the National Science Museum of Japan in Ueno.

Hachikō was the subject of the 1987 movie Hachikō-Monogatari (ハチ公物語, literally “Hachiko’s Tale”?),[9] which told the story of his life from his birth up until his death and imagined spiritual reunion with his master. Considered a blockbuster success, the film was the last big hit for Japanese film studio Shochiku Kinema Kenkyû-jo.[10][11]

Main article: Hachiko: A Dog’s Story

Hachi: A Dog’s Story,[12] released in August 2009, is an American movie starring actor Richard Gere, directed by Lasse Hallström, about Hachikō and his relationship with the professor. The movie was filmed in Rhode Island, and also featured Joan Allen and Jason Alexander.

[edit] Books

Hachikō is also the subject of a 2004 children’s book named Hachikō: The True Story of a Loyal Dog, written by Pamela S. Turner and illustrated by Yan Nascimbene. Another children’s book, a short novel for readers of all ages called Hachiko Waits, written by Lesléa Newman and illustrated by Machiyo Kodaira, was published by Henry Holt & Co. in 2004. Hachiko Waits was released in paperback by Square Fish (an imprint of MacMillan) in 2009.

Hachikō is featured prominently in the 2008 novel The Story of Edgar Sawtelle by David Wroblewski.[13] The novel revolves around the extraordinary relationship between the title character, his family and the dogs they raise.

[edit] Radio

In 1994, the Culture Broadcasting Network (CBN) in Japan was able to lift a recording of Hachikō barking from an old record that had been broken into several pieces. A huge advertising campaign ensued and on Saturday, May 28, 1994, 59 years after his death, millions of radio listeners tuned in to hear Hachikō bark.[14] This event was testimony to Hachikō’s continuing popularity.

[edit] Television

In the Futurama episode, “Jurassic Bark”, Fry finds the fossilized remains of his dog, Seymour. Given the chance to clone him, Fry takes it, but stops the cloning process mid-way through, believing that Seymour would have forgotten about Fry after he was frozen. It is revealed at the end of the episode that Seymour waited for Fry to return from his delivery for 12 years until his death.