California delta’s water mysteriously missing amid drought


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California delta’s water mysteriously missing amid drought

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — As California struggles with a devastating drought, huge amounts of water are mysteriously vanishing from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta — and the prime suspects are farmers whose families have tilled fertile soil there for generations.

 In this photo taken Friday March 27, 2015, farmer Rudy Mussi poses at one of his pumps that draws water from a slough to irrigate his farm land in the...
In this photo taken Friday March 27, 2015, farmer Rudy Mussi poses at one of his pumps that draws water from a slough to irrigate his farm land in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta near Stockton, Calif. As California enters the fourth year of drought, huge amounts of water are mysteriously vanishing from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, and farmers whose families for generations have tilled fertile soil there are the prime suspects. Delta farmers deny they are stealing water, still, they have been asked to report how much water they’re pumping and to prove their legal right. Mussi says he has senior water rights in a system more than a century old that puts him in line ahead of those with lower ranking, or junior, water rights.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

A state investigation was launched following complaints from two large agencies that supply water to arid farmland in the Central Valley and to millions of residents as far south as San Diego.

Delta farmers don’t deny using as much water as they need. But they say they’re not stealing it because their history of living at the water’s edge gives them that right. Still, they have been asked to report how much water they’re pumping and to prove their legal rights to it.

At issue is California’s century-old water rights system that has been based on self-reporting and little oversight, historically giving senior water rights holders the ability to use as much water as they need, even in drought. Gov. Jerry Brown has said that if drought continues this system built into California’s legal framework will probably need to be examined.

Delta farmer Rudy Mussi says he has senior water rights, putting him in line ahead of those with lower ranking, or junior, water rights.

“If there’s surplus water, hey, I don’t mind sharing it,” Mussi said. “I don’t want anybody with junior water rights leapfrogging my senior water rights just because they have more money and more political clout.”

The fight pitting farmer against farmer is playing out in the Delta, the hub of the state’s water system. With no indication of the drought easing, heightened attention is being placed on dwindling water throughout the state, which produces nearly half of the fruits, nuts and vegetables grown in the U.S.

A large inland estuary east of San Francisco, the Delta is fed by rivers of freshwater flowing down from the Sierra Nevada and northern mountain ranges. Located at sea level, it consists of large tracts of farmland separated by rivers that are subject to tidal ebbs and flows.

Most of the freshwater washes out to the Pacific Ocean through the San Francisco Bay. Some is pumped — or diverted — by Delta farmers to irrigate their crops, and some is sent south though canals to Central Valley farmers and to 25 million people statewide.

The drought now in its fourth year has put Delta water under close scrutiny. Twice last year state officials feared salty bay water was backing up into the Delta, threatening water quality. There was not enough fresh water to keep out saltwater.

In June, the state released water stored for farmers and communities from Lake Oroville to combat the saltwater intrusion.

Nancy Vogel, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Water Resources, said “thousands of acre-feet of water a day for a couple of weeks” were released into the Delta. An acre-foot is roughly enough water to supply a household of four for a year.

The fact that the state had to resort to using so much from storage raised questions about where the water was going. That in turn prompted a joint letter by the Department of Water Resources and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation calling for an investigation into how much water Delta farmers are taking — and whether the amount exceeds their rights to it.

“We don’t know if there were illegal diversions going on at this time,” said Vogel, leaving it up to officials at the State Water Resources Control Board to determine. “Right now, a large information gap exists.”

Some 450 farmers who hold 1,061 water rights in the Delta and the Sacramento and San Joaquin river watersheds were told to report their water diversions, and Katherine Mrowka, state water board enforcement manager, said a vast majority responded.

State officials are sorting through the information that will help them determine whether any are exceeding their water rights and who should be subject to restrictions.

“In this drought period, water accounting is more important to ensure that the water is being used for its intended purpose,” said U.S. Bureau of Reclamation spokesman Louis Moore.

Mussi, a second-generation Delta farmer whose family grows tomatoes, wheat, corn, grapes and almonds on 4,500 acres west of Stockton, said Central Valley farmers have long known that in dry years they would get little or no water from state and federal water projects and would need to rely heavily on groundwater.

“All of a sudden they’re trying to turn their water into a permanent system and ours temporary,” Mussi said. “It’s just not going to work.”

Shawn Coburn farms 1,500 acres along the San Joaquin River in Firebaugh about 100 miles south of the Delta. As a senior rights holder, he figures he will receive 45 percent or less of the water he expected from the federal water project. On another 1,500 acres where he is a junior water rights holder, he will receive no surface water for a second consecutive year.

“I don’t like to pick on other farmers, even if it wasn’t a drought year,” said Coburn. “The only difference is I don’t have a pipe in the Delta I can suck willy-nilly whenever I want.”

Crazy winds throw window cleaners for a scary swing ride on 91st floor


Post 6700

Casey Chan

http://sploid.gizmodo.com/crazy-winds-throw-window-cleaners-for-a-scary-swing-rid-1695577693/+cherylvis

Crazy winds throw window cleaners for a scary swing ride on 91st floor

Crazy winds throw window cleaners for a scary swing ride on 91st floor

Dear Lord. Cleaning the windows of skyscrapers is already a scary enough job but cleaning windows of the 91st floor of the 1600-foot tall Shanghai World Financial Center while the wind violently throws around the scaffolding like some unhinged, unbuckled roller coaster swing? That is absolutely pants laundering terrifying.

The workers were thankfully rescued but had to ride out the scary ass winds for 15 minutes. I would have passed out in the first 15 seconds. Check out the video:

http://www.liveleak.com/ll_embed?f=1fe36bbd897c

And here’s the building they were cleaning. It’s the 7th tallest building in the world (and a bottle opener for giants):

Crazy winds throw window cleaners for a scary swing ride on 91st floor

Image Credit: Wikipedia

Wounded officer commanded respect in Iraq


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Wounded officer commanded respect in Iraq

http://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2015/03/28/boston-police-officer-wounded-shooting-earned-respect-iraq/u3nyhdSwSOKDhtPxy5BVWO/story.html?s_campaign=email_BG_TodaysHeadline

As a platoon leader in a volatile region of Iraq known as the “Triangle of Death,” Army Ranger Lieutenant John Moynihan used to say there were two ways to be a leader: pull rank and force soldiers to follow, or earn their respect. He knew — and his men knew — which kind he was.

“He lived by that respect,” said Joshua Bartlett, who served under Moynihan as a sergeant and team leader in 2007. Whether Moynihan’s men were taking heavy fire or laying concertina wire, Moynihan was right there in the middle of the action, working shoulder to shoulder. “He respected us, we respected him.”

On Saturday, Moynihan, who left the military and became a Boston police gang unit officer, lay in a medically induced coma at Boston Medical Center, a bullet lodged behind his right ear. Moynihan, who was honored for his bravery in the Watertown shootout with the Boston Marathon bombers in April 2013, had been shot point blank in the face, allegedly by a convicted felon with a history of shooting at police.

“It is clear that Officer Moynihan is a hero for our city, and the entire nation, and today we are thankful for all of those who put their lives on the line every day to protect us,” Mayor Martin J. Walsh said in a statement Saturday.

“He’s a strong kid. Given what great shape he’s in, he’s a fighter. He’s going to pull through,” Police Commissioner William B. Evans said at a press conference Saturday morning.

Moynihan and five other officers were investigating a report of gunshots fired in the area of Humboldt Avenue on Friday night when they stopped a sport utility vehicle with three men inside. When Moynihan walked to the driver’s side, Angelo West, 41, allegedly leapt from the car and began firing a .357 Magnum. Moynihan was struck before he had time to unholster his weapon, according to authorities.

West was shot to death and a woman was wounded in the gun battle that followed.

When you find out that it was an officer that you know, and an officer that helped save your life — it is definitely more significant.’

Richard “Dic” Donohue Jr.  

Quote Icon

Moynihan, 34, who joined the Police Department six years ago as an officer in Dorchester and then moved to the gang unit in 2011, has received eight commissioner’s commendations for his work, according to police Lieutenant Michael McCarthy.

During the Watertown shootout with Boston Marathon bombers Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Moynihan helped save transit police officer Richard “Dic” Donohue Jr., stanching a gunshot wound. Moynihan was honored for bravery with the department’s Medal of Honor and with the Top Cop Award at the White House last year.

“It was gut-wrenching to hear that, first of all, there was any officer injured in that way in the line of duty,” Donohue said on Saturday. “And when you find out that it was an officer that you know, and an officer that helped save your life — it is definitely more significant.”

Donohue said his family was praying for a full and speedy recovery for Moynihan.

“He’s shown his merit, whether it’s . . . saving my life, or being on patrol and working hard in the Youth Violence Strike Force,” said Donohue. “Those guys are putting their lives on the line every day to make the city a better place.”

Moynihan’s willingness to risk his life to protect others earned him a sterling reputation among his soldiers in Iraq, who nicknamed him “Banana Hands” — a fond reference to his gigantic stature — and who were willing to follow him anywhere because they knew he would fight for them every step of the way, Bartlett said.

Bartlett said the platoon was stationed not on a military base but “in sector” — setting up in homes in Iraqi villages. One day, Bartlett said, fighters hiding behind a palm grove began shooting and firing rocket-propelled grenades at soldiers who were stationed on the rooftop of their building.

Bartlett and his team raced upstairs and Moynihan charged out to the rooftop with him, grabbed a gun, and started directing soldiers where to fire.

“Most lieutenants would have probably been on a radio or in a staircase somewhere, protected,” said Bartlett. “He was right in the middle of it. We had to remind him sometimes that he was a lieutenant.”

When Bartlett left the military and was contemplating becoming a police officer, Moynihan encouraged him, and told him to simply employ the same rules they had followed in Iraq: “When you’re going through the bad stuff, keep your head up. And, I’m always here.”

Bartlett, who is now a police officer in Lubbock, Texas, is one of about 20 of Moynihan’s former soldiers — now spread across the country from Texas to Pennsylvania to Rhode Island — who are planning to fly to Boston to see him.

“Everybody’s praying for him right now,” said Bartlett. “It’s time to pray for him and let him know that his other family’s thinking about him, and we want to be there with him.”

John Moynihan can be seen far left in this photograph taken in Iraq.

HANDOUT

John Moynihan can be seen far left in this photograph taken in Iraq.

Laura Crimaldi of the Globe staff contributed to this report. Evan Allen can be reached at evan.allen@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @evanmallen.

Children of war


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Children of war

http://www.bostonglobe.com/news/bigpicture/2015/03/13/children-war/7FrhDO4GhmMrBrHqlzPCmO/story.html?p1=BP_Headline

The United Nations children’s agency reported this week that 14 million children in Syria and Iraq are in crisis due to war. The number of children needing aid has greatly increased from the previous year and there are fears that living with the severe violence will permanently scar the young generation. Here is a look at recent photos depicting the lives of children during this conflict.–By Leanne Burden Seidel
Pupils attend the first day of school in the Syrian Kurdish town of Kobane, also known as Ain al-Arab on March 2. They returned to class after Kurdish and rebel forces expelled Islamic State (IS) group jihadists from the town following more than four months of fighting. (Michalis Karagiannis/AFP/Getty Images)
Boys play with a BB gun in the Douma neighborhood of Damascus March 4. (Bassam Khabieh/Reuters)
3
Wounded Syrian children react as they wait for treatment at a clinic in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, following reported air strikes by regime forces on March 13. More than 210,000 people have been killed in Syria since the uprising began in March 2011. (Abd Douamany/AFP/Getty Images)
4
Syrian refugee children attend class in a UNICEF school at the Al Zaatari refugee camp in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the border with Syria March 11. Nearly four million people have fled Syria since 2011, when anti-government protests turned into a violent civil war. Jordan says it is sheltering around 1.3 million refugees. (Muhammad Hamed/Reuters)
5
A Kurdish fighter walks with his child in the center of the Syrian border town of Kobane, known as Ain al-Arab, on January 28. (BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)
6
A displaced Iraqi Sunni girl who fled with many others the villages of of Albu Ajil and Al-Dor due to fighting between Islamic State (IS) group militants and government forces surrounding the northern Iraqi city of Tikrit, cries after arriving at an army camp in the city of Samarra to take refuge on March 8. (AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images)
7
Syrian children walk through the debris in the rebel-held area of Douma, east of the capital Damascus, following reported air strikes by regime forces on March 13. (Abd Douamany/AFP/Getty Images)
8
Mourners chant slogans against the Islamic State group during the funeral procession of three members of a Shiite group, Asaib Ahl al-Haq, or League of the Righteous, who were killed in Tikrit while fighting Islamic militants, in Najaf, 100 miles (160 kilometers) south of Baghdad, Iraq, , March 11. (Jaber al-Helo/Associated Press)
9
An injured child sits on a bed in a field hospital after what activists said were air strikes by forces loyal to Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad in Douma eastern Al-Ghouta, near Damascus Jan. 25. (Badra Mamet/Reuters)
10
Syrian children reenact scenes, they said to have seen in Islamic State videos, in the rebel-held Damascus suburb of Douma, on March 5. (Abd Doumany/AFP/Getty Images)
11
Syrian girls, carrying school bags provided by UNICEF, walk past the rubble of destroyed buildings on their way home from school on March 7 in al-Shaar neighborhood, in the rebel-held side of the northern Syrian city of Aleppo. (IZEIN AL-RIFAI/AFP/Getty Images)
12
Turkish actress Tuba Buyukustun (3rd R), goodwill ambassador for UNICEF, speaks with Syrian refugee children as she visits a UNICEF centre at the Zaatari refugee camp, in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the border with Syria March 4. The Zaatari camp houses at least 70,000 Syrian refugees. (Muhammad Hamed /Reuters)
13
A woman and her child sit in a military vehicle as she returns home at the town of Tal Ksaiba, near the town of al-Alam, Iraq, March 7. (Thaier Al-Sudani/Reuters)
14
Pupils run through a damaged wall for the first day of school in the Syrian Kurdish town of Kobane, also known as Ain al-Arab, as they returned to class after Kurdish and rebel forces expelled Islamic State (IS) group jihadists from the town following more than four months of fighting. (Michalis Karagiannis/AFP/Getty Images)
15
Syrian refugee children stand in the corridor at the Al-Rama Public School that is home to 22 Syrian families in Wadi Khaled in the Lebanese-Syrian border village of Al-Rama, north Lebanon. (Hussein Malla/Associated Press)
16
Displaced Syrian children gather in a classroom in a school that has been turned into a temporary shelter in the Qudsaya neighborhood on the outskirts of Damascus, Syria, Feb. 23. (Associated Press)
17
A Syrian child receives a vaccination against polio during a campaign organized by the Syrian Arab Red Crescent (SARC) in the rebel-held area of Eastern Ghouta, on the outskirts of the capital Damascus, on Feb. 22. (ABD DOUMANY/AFP/Getty Images)
18
A Syrian refugee child clears snow on a snowy day in Istanbul, Turkey, Feb. 19. (ULAS YUNUS TOSUN/EPA)
19
A Syrian child sits in the back of a truck loaded with furniture as residents collect what’s left of their belongings from their apartments on Feb. 13, following months of shelling by regime forces in the besieged rebel held area of Douma, north east of the capital Damascus. (SAMEER AL-DOUMY/AFP/Getty Images)
20
Yazidi refugees in their accomodation in a refugee camp in Erbil, Iraq, Feb. 20. The Yazidi religious community fled parts of Iraq currently controlled by the Islamic State militants (IS). (ROBERT JAEGER/EPA)
21
A Syrian man carries a wounded child at a makeshift clinic following reported air strikes by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad in the rebel held area of Douma on Feb. 5. Syrian rebels fired dozens of mortar rounds at Damascus, killing at least five people, with government forces responding with air strikes that killed eight people. (ABD DOUMANY/AFP/Getty Images)
22
Syrian refugee children who fled violence in Syrian city of Ain al-Arab, known also as Kobani, collect water in a camp in the border town of Suruc, Turkey, Feb. 1. (Emrah Gurel/Associated Press)
23
Syrian children play on Feb. 1 at the Rojava refugee camp in Sanliurfa. (BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)
24
An injured child reacts in a field hospital after what activists said were air strikes by forces loyal to Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad in Douma eastern Al-Ghouta, near Damascus Jan. 25. (Badra Mame/Reuters)
25
Kurdish childrens stand in the center of the Syrian town of Kobane, also known as Ain al-Arab on Jan. 28. (BULENT KILIC/AFP/Getty Images)
26
A boy carries bread as he makes his way through rubble of damaged buildings in the Douma neighborhood of Damascus, March 4. (Bassam Khabieh/Reuters)
27
An injured Syrian child waits for treatment at a makeshift hospital in the rebel held area of Douma, north east of the capital Damascus, following reported air strikes by forces loyal to President Bashar al-Assad on Feb. 2. (ABD DOUMANY/AFP/Getty Images)

Abused Schnauzer Found Tied To A Tree Makes An Amazing Transformation After His Rescue


Post 6619

Abused Schnauzer Found Tied To A Tree Makes An Amazing Transformation After His Rescue

Read more at http://www.reshareworthy.com/kingsley-the-schnauzer-tied-to-a-tree-rescued/#214dJMH9gTdRoIvj.99

When Heather Vargas first saw a picture of a Schnauzer named Kingsley she fell in love with him. When she learned how he had been found and what had happened to him, she knew she had to rescue him.

Heather shared Kingsley’s heartwarming transformation with Reshareworthy.com and when you see Kingsley from when he was rescued to present day, you’ll fall in love with him just like Heather did.

“Kingsley was found tied to a tree on some country land. He had been neglected, beaten, and starved. His hair was matted and painful from not being taken care of.”

image: http://www.reshareworthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/kingsley-1.jpg

 

kingsley-1

“After they shaved him, he was found to have numerous wounds on his body. Some were old scars and some were fresh and bloody. How anyone could beat a 15 pound schnauzer is beyond me. I wish a special hell for them.”

image: http://www.reshareworthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/kingsley-2.jpg

 

kingsley-2

“You can still see how skittish and skinny he is. He was so abused he was afraid of most people, especially men. But this is the picture I saw online and fell in love with. I knew I had to rescue him.”

image: http://www.reshareworthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/kingsley-3.jpg

 

kingsley-3

“The night we adopted him. The people who found him had him for about a month before we adopted him (they’re a small rescue organization). He had bonded with one of the women and was not happy about leaving her. It broke my heart. But now I’m his main woman so it’s all OK.”

image: http://www.reshareworthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/kingsley-4.jpg

 

kingsley-4

“First month in his new home. So many things we had to work on. Potty training (he’d never been in a house before), barking, possessiveness (he took to me quickly and tried to fend off my husband if he came near), car rides, etc. He didn’t even know how to play with toys.”

image: http://www.reshareworthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/kingsley-5.jpg

 

“My goob :)”

kingsley-5

image: http://www.reshareworthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/kingsley-6.jpg

 

kingsley-6

“He picked up everything so quickly! We’re now 2-weeks accident free and he’s gotten most “dog things” down. He loves fetch, car rides, cuddles, vegetables, and dryer sheets (he’s a weird one).”

image: http://www.reshareworthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/kingsley-7.jpg

 

“My boy today. He’s filled out to his ideal weight and is getting super fluffy. We’re taking him to the groomer later this month for a proper schnauzer cut. He’s come such a long way, and it’s been a battle sometimes. But when he’s snuggled in my lap and gently gives my hand or face a kiss, I know how grateful he is and how it’s all worth it.”

image: http://www.reshareworthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/kingsley-8.jpg

 

kingsley-7

Photos republished on Reshareworthy.com with permission from Heather Vargas.

“I’m trying to do everything I can to make up for his past and show him the love he hasn’t known for 3 years,” says Heather. “I want to find the person who did that to him and tie THEM to a tree and leave them there. But he’s such an amazing dog and has come around completely.”

Please share Kingsley’s amazing transformation with your friends and family!
Read more at http://www.reshareworthy.com/kingsley-the-schnauzer-tied-to-a-tree-rescued/#214dJMH9gTdRoIvj.99

Heroic Dog Buries Her Puppies And Saves Them From Devastating Forest Fire


Post 6618

Heroic Dog Buries Her Puppies And Saves Them From Devastating Forest Fire

Read more at http://www.reshareworthy.com/dog-saves-puppies-from-forest-fire/#RSuqmx6tJ7uCBi2u.99

A mother dog desperate to save her newborn puppies from a forest fire raging through Valparaiso, Chile, buried her puppies in a deep hole to protect them from the flames and smoke. She then ran away and found shelter for herself. Miraculously, all 10 dogs were found alive and in good condition.

image: http://www.reshareworthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/puppies-forest-fire-4.jpg

puppies-forest-fire-4

 

It was a rare piece of good news for people in the area. The huge fire, which started on Friday, March 2015 has burned for days. One person was killed and thousands were evacuated as the fire spread. The fire is believed to have started at an illegal landfill site.

image: http://www.reshareworthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/puppies-forest-fire-2.jpg

puppies-forest-fire-2

 

Firefighters were putting out tires that had caught on fire, when someone told them that they had seen the dog dig a hole under the tires. They investigated and found 9 puppies around 2-weeks-old and after 45 minutes had freed and rescued all of them. They went on to rescue the mom who was hiding under a container.

image: http://www.reshareworthy.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/puppies-forest-fire-1.jpg

puppies-forest-fire-1

 

The puppies were reunited with their mother, who has been named “La Negrita” and the homeless family is now being looked after by volunteers. Many residents in the area have already expressed interest in adopting the dogs.

Below is a longer video of the dramatic rescue. Note the video is in Spanish.

Share this amazing rescue story with your animal-loving friends and family!
Read more at http://www.reshareworthy.com/dog-saves-puppies-from-forest-fire/#RSuqmx6tJ7uCBi2u.99

Man Removes Nose to Look More Like Red Skull


Post 6473

James Whitbrook

http://toybox.io9.com/man-removes-nose-to-look-more-like-red-skull-1683747234/+katharinetrendacosta

Man Removes Nose to Look More Like Red Skull

Man Removes Nose to Look More Like Red Skull

Venezuelan Henry Damon has long admired Marvel’s Red Skull, the archnemesis of Captain America – and he’s chosen to display his love for the character through extreme body modification. Warning: There is a picture and footage of the modification after the cut, and it’s graphic, so proceed with caution.

Damon went through a series of surgeries, including sub-dermal implants in his forehead and the tattooing of his eyes, before going under the knife to remove the front section of his nose, to emulate the skull-like appearance of his Marvel idol:

Man Removes Nose to Look More Like Red Skull

Damon poses after his surgery at the Expo Tatoo Venezuela in Caracas on January 29, 2015. Image Credit: FEDERICO PARRA/AFP/Getty Images

You can also see Damon’s modication near the end of this video taken at Expo Tatoo Venezeula from the Daily Mail, and more graphic images of the surgical process in this BodModz video as well:

The surgery was performed by Emilio Gonzalez, an alleged medical school dropout who now specialises in tattooing and extreme body modification. Gonzalez apparently conducted several psychological tests with Damon – who now also goes by ‘Red Skull’ – before agreeing to perform the surgery:

‘Most of my customers know that body modification is the last step of body art, everyone knows very well what they want and as well as Henry, many of them are waiting for me for many years to make their dreams a reality.’

Damon’s journey to becoming the Red Skull isn’t over – aside from planning to get his face tattooed all over to emulate the Skull’s red colouring, he also intends on getting more sub-dermal implants in his cheeks and chin to complete the look.

[ The Daily Mail via Comic Book Resources]


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